The protected two-way bike lanes on Harbour Road, linking the Galloping Goose Trail with the Johnson Street bridge. (Black Press Media file photo)

The protected two-way bike lanes on Harbour Road, linking the Galloping Goose Trail with the Johnson Street bridge. (Black Press Media file photo)

POLL: Do you agree with the City of Victoria’s direction on the expansion of bike lanes?

The City of Victoria is rolling along with plans to expand its cycling network.

Construction is set to begin this summer on bike lanes along Richardson Street, Kings-Haultain, Kimta/E&N, and Government Street North. Planning is underway for the next phase in the 32km all ages and ability cycling network, with the city seeking input on designs and route options for James Bay.

The Richardson Street redesign has drawn a storm of opposition, with city council defeating a motion to revisit the plan last month.

ALSO READ: Richardson Street redesign continues to hear opposition in Victoria

Coun. Stephen Andrew said he had received “upwards of 200” resident complaints from people questioning the design for the Richardson corridor.

The potential for commuter and other non-resident traffic on Richardson to spill over onto neighbouring streets is worrisome, said Linda Barry, who lives nearby on Richmond Road. In March she sent mayor and council a nine-point list of concerns relating to the project.

“I’m concerned with the school zone at Chandler (Avenue), which has a very congested crosswalk,” she said, noting neighbouring streets are very narrow. “More traffic will be flowing onto Richmond, Foul Bay and on Fairfield.”

The Richardson plan also stirred up controversy in neighbouring Oak Bay, Richardson becomes McNeill Avenue at Foul Bay Road.

Fort Street has been selected for protected one-way bike lanes to the city’s border with Oak Bay.

ALSO READ: Fort Street is Victoria’s preferred bike lane route from junction to Foul Bay

Fort Street was chosen as the priority AAA cycling corridor between the junction at Pandora and Oak Bay avenues and Foul Bay Road. Staff will complete a detailed design to be put into the 2022 budget and construction schedule.

Simpler, shared-road designs for Oaklands and Fernwood connectors were approved and will be added to the 2021 schedule, using existing funds. The Oaklands route runs from Hillside Avenue to Haultain Street, along Doncaster Drive, Pearl Street, Shakespeare Street and through Oaklands Park. The Fernwood route connects Haultain and Begbie streets via Avebury, Oregon and Stanley avenues.

Do you agree with the City of Victoria’s direction on the expansion of bike lanes? Take our poll and let us know.


 

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