Oak Bay should join amalgamation talks

Oak Bay is in desperate need of statesmen and stateswomen

We urgently need statesmen and stateswomen now. Why? Because it’s later than you probably think, in terms of the arrival of several crucial problems that are rapidly converging upon us all.  Namely:

We’ve hardly experienced even the first symptoms of the dreaded climate change that we have already loaded into the world’s climate system and is just now beginning to descend upon us, while we continue to load that system  for ever worse to come;

World food security, which primarily depends on abundant clean water, stable conditions and more, is in serious distress now;

We’ve encouraged human populations to continue to grow exponentially and the populations of most other life required for balanced life-systems are in deep distress;

Centuries of unstoppable sea level rise are now beginning; and much more.

Do any of our leaders truly understand the position we are in and are any willing to come clean with us and start counteracting these problems?

We need genuine statesmen and stateswomen now.

What are statesmen and stateswomen?  The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines both as persons skilled in affairs of state, especially taking an active part in politics: in short, distinguished politicians.  Based on my observations, I would add:  highly respected and exceptionally accomplished, highly ethical, clear sighted, visionary doers, high achievers and more.

We are desperately in need of genuine statespersons at every level of government, including  municipal governments, where the weight of our problems will surely fall in large measure.  In Oak Bay, this  means it would be foolhardy to withdraw from detailed consideration of how best to consider rationalization of certain essential municipal services.

Past human survival of close calls has most often been the product of co-operation and collaboration.   High walls that isolate small city states from help, too often in history failed badly.  Do we have any genuine statespersons competent to cope well with the foregoing issues?   If so, they need to step forward and prepare to provide effective leadership now.

We need to gain admission and to participate in tentative amalgamation talks now.  This should be an open negotiation, involving consultation with all residents.  Not to participate in this will probably lead to our long repentance, in lonely isolation.  For this will then be a lost opportunity to collaboratively work together to solve these enormous life-threatening problems.

Norman Mogensen

 

Oak Bay