Editorial: Cenotaph, service makeover a valuable exercise

Makeover of Oak Bay's cenotaph and Remembrance Day ceremony will make them even more meaningful

As we approach November, people of all ages will soon sport poppies on their lapels, a symbol whose roots reach back to the First World War that recalls the sacrifices made on the battlefield.

While veterans of that great conflict have since passed, we continue to honour their memories – their sacrifices – and those of all who have come after, with this same symbol.

Oak Bay’s symbol of sacrifice, the cenotaph, was built in 1948 and dedicated to those who gave their life in the Second World War.

Updated in 2004 to honour all those lost in the First World War, Korean War and during peacekeeping missions, the municipal heritage site welcomes hundreds each Remembrance Day for the annual service.

While those who gather Nov. 11, and indeed those who visit throughout the year, likely see the cenotaph as a touchstone for all sacrifices made in times of war and peacekeeping, the efforts of those on the Oak Bay Cenotaph Task Group are valuable.

While more recent campaigns have not happened on the massive scale of those earlier conflicts, the impacts on those who served and their families is no less significant.

Appropriately, the task group brought together members from a cross-section of the community, including an Oak Bay archivist and heritage specialist, an environmental/ landscape activist, a citizenship judge and retired Canadian Forces reservist, and a serving member of the Canadian Forces Reserve who served in Afghanistan.

The effort, explains task group chair Coun. Tara Ney, aims both to be more inclusive in the ceremony and create a more accessible space for remembrance “that honours the beliefs of those who are there, without excluding others… The initiative will provide an opportunity to strengthen public recognition of the site as a special place.”

We are well-served by their efforts.

 

 

 

Just Posted

Two popular Oak Bay art pieces to be installed permanently

Bodhi Frog and The Hunt stay thanks to public support and Oak Bay arts laureate Barbara Adams

Deadline looms for second annual Acorn Arts Award

Nominations for Oak Bay award must be in by Jan. 19

Upgrades to Millstream overpass to begin Feb. 1

Project includes addition of left hand turn lane onto highway to Victoria

VIDEO: Murdoch to run for mayor

Two-term councillor Kevin Murdoch announces his intent to run for mayor’s chair in fall election

Langford loses bid to host Amazon HQ2

Mayor hopes to attract more tech jobs to city

VIDEO: Murdoch to run for mayor

Two-term councillor Kevin Murdoch announces his intent to run for mayor’s chair in fall election

Christopher Garnier appealing murder conviction in death of off-duty cop

Jury found Garnier guilty in December, rejecting his claim she died accidentally during rough sex

Transportation watchdog must revisit air passenger obesity complaint

Canadian Transportation Agency must take new look at Gabor Lukacs’ complaint against Delta Air Lines

Gas plants verdict coming down today; ex-premier’s top aides to learn fate

Verdict to be delivered on senior staff to former Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty

WestJet appeals lost bid to scrap harassment lawsuit

Airline argues judge was wrong to have dismissed the company’s application to strike the legal action

Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here’s how

Secretary of homeland security explains a new policy that let’s border guards check phones

‘Beautiful writer’ Nancy Richler dies of cancer in Vancouver hospital

Montreal-born author spent most of her adult life in B.C. as a fiction writer and novelist

Jury convicts spear-wielding Duncan man in 2015 Ladysmith RV park murder

Trever George Meers used a handmade spear to stab Rayna Johnson at the Campers Corners RV Park

Students frustrated by UBCO response to harassment allegations

Students on the Kelowna campus were unaware of resources and worried about lack of communication

Most Read