United Way Greater Victoria staff, Heather Skydt (left), Kelly Binette and Gayle Nye, stand amongst a mountain of pads, tampons and other menstrual products collected during the Period Promise Fill the Bus event. (United Way Greater Victoria)

Victoria fulfills period promise with free menstrual products

Tampons, pads and other products available at City Hall and downtown washrooms

Free menstrual products such as tampons and pads will now be available in various City of Victoria civic facilities, including city hall, Crystal Pool and downtown public washrooms.

This follows United Way Greater Victoria’s Period Promise, which has now partnered with the City of Victoria.

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“The City of Victoria is proud to be the first municipality in B.C. to make the United Way Period Promise,” said Mayor Lisa Helps. “We know that not having access to menstrual products when you need them can be a risk to people’s health and socially isolating. Providing free menstrual products in city facilities is a small, practical thing we can do that will make a big difference in the lives of many people in our community.”

“Monthly menstruation products are a necessity, but if you’re living in poverty – or vulnerable in other ways – access to menstrual products can be challenging,” says Mark Breslauer, CEO, United Way Greater Victoria. “We thank the City of Victoria for joining the Period Promise movement and breaking down barriers by providing access to free products in their facilities.”

“Providing free menstrual products helps people live with the dignity that we all deserve,” says Coun. Laurel Collins, who brought the idea forward. “Supporting the Period Promise campaign raises awareness about period poverty in our community and it reduces stigma.”

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A number of organizations and businesses have engaged with Period Promise across the province, offering free and accessible products in their workplaces. In response to the Period Promise campaign, in April, the B.C. government declared that all B.C. public schools will be required to provide free menstrual products for students in school washrooms by the end of the year.

The United Way’s Period Promise initiative advises that people can participate by donating money or by organizing a Period Promise campaign of their own, collecting tampons, pads, cups or menstrual underwear.

For more information, visit periodpromise.ca.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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