The province has authorized grizzly and black bear hunting

NHLer Clayton Stoner caught in grizzly bear hunting controversy

Stoner – from Port McNeill – appears in photos online, showing him posing with a severed grizzly bear head and paws.

B.C.-born hockey player Clayton Stoner is the latest athlete caught in an animal hunting controversy.

Photos have emerged online, showing Stoner posing with the severed head of a grizzly bear, and decked out in camouflage fatigues. The image is believed to have been taken in May, 2013, by field technicians in B.C.’s Kwatna estuary.

The bear’s nickname was ‘Cheeky’, and it was being documented by filmmakers from Coastal First Nations (CFN), who have developed a PSA to end bear hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest. Last year, the CFN banned bear hunting on its territories.

(The film is being screened this morning – Wednesday, Sept. 4 – at Telus World of Science.)

“I grew up hunting and fishing in British Columbia and continue to enjoy spending time with my family outdoors,” Stoner said in a statement released by his NHL club, the Minnesota Wild.

“I applied for and received a grizzly bear hunting license through a British Columbia limited entry lottery last winter and shot a grizzly bear with my licence while hunting with my father, uncle and a friend in May.

“I love to hunt and fish and will continue to do so with my family and friends in British Columbia.”

The bear’s paws were also found severed, according to CFN, and the animal was skinned and its remains found left to rot (*graphic photos below).

Stoner, who played his first full season with the Wild last year, is from Port McNeill, B.C.

Jessie Housty, a councillor with the Heilstuk First Nation, said Clayton identified himself with the makers of the CFN’s film, and said the PSA focuses on the hunted – not the hunters.

“We are not profiling any hunters in the film,” she told The Globe and Mail‘s Andrea Woo and Wendy Stueck. “The issue for us is the broader hunting culture in B.C., not vilifying particular hunters.”

The Globe also said black and grizzly bear hunting is authorized in British Columbia, and the CFN has been asked (by the province) to respect its authority over the bear hunt.

————————————————————

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Just Posted

Washington State man facing murder charges in 1987 killing of Victoria couple

Two counts of aggravated first-degree murder filed against William Talbott II in Snohomish

Student works online from the Oak Bay High Short Film Fest

Divine Tragedy earns People’s Choice award during viewing event

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria expansion gets $6M boost from province

Project many years in the making, but planned for current Rockland site

Labour pains: cheap help is hard to find on Vancouver Island

Big Read: high demand for workers, lack of affordable living mean imperfect storm for businesses

Does a creature lurk beneath Cadboro Bay?

Researchers on hunt for Cadborosaurus, with sightings dating back centuries along the B.C. coast

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

From marijuana beer to pot cookies, Canadian companies creating cannabis edibles

Manufacturers think that edibles will do well with users who don’t want to smoke or vape

Saanich players make cut with Island field hockey team

Team will compete at B.C. Summer Games in Cowichan

Smart technology bridge proposed to cross Saanich Inlet

Meant to offer alternative to crossing Malahat

B.C. NHL prospect expected to make ‘full recovery’ after an incident in Calgary

Jordy Bellerive was injured in a reported house fire Saturday night

BC Lions defensive back Marcell Young levels streaker in home opener

Young hit the fan near one of the 45-yard lines

Police: Taxi driver who hit 8 Moscow pedestrians fell asleep

Two Mexican World Cup fans were among those hit

B.C. VIEWS: Orphans of our urban drug culture neglected again

Child advocate Bernard Richard leaves B.C. with harsh message

Most Read