Langford’s Kimberly Proctor was the victim of a brutal assault and murder in 2010. (Facebook/Kimberly’s Law)

Man who killed Langford teen attended her memorial service, demonstrates little remorse

Parole Board of Canada documents reveal factors in parole decision

*Warning, this story contains details of a rape and murder

“Bizarre” and “weird” is how a family member of Kimberly Proctor — a Langford teen who was brutally assaulted, tortured and murdered — describes the parole hearing of one of the teen’s killers.

Kruse Wellwood applied for day parole earlier this year from Mission Institution, a medium-security prison.

On Aug. 14, members of the Parole Board of Canada, Proctor’s family and Wellwood gathered at the prison for his hearing.

“I was actually right behind him,” said Jo-Anne Landolt, Proctor’s aunt. “He wasn’t allowed to turn around…it was weird, bizarre hearing him talk about [the murder].”

While the Parole Board of Canada denied his request, a document regarding the decision details what went behind the decision.

“The board notes you have made some progress,” the decision reads. “However, the board has many concerns.”

The document goes on, saying that while Wellwood accepted responsibility, his comments during the hearing were inconsistent with that.

“Your description of the index offence was cold and clinical, and belied any true sense of remorse or accountability,” the document notes. “You lured, raped and killed the victim in a brutal and cruel way, and you then mutilated her and abandoned her burned body. And while discussing such a horrific crime, you presented with no apparent emotion.”

Landolt said the family was not surprised he was denied parole.

Another detail revealed by the document is that Wellwood attended Proctor’s memorial service.

“The police identified you and your co-accused as suspects and placed you under surveillance,” the document says. “You were seen attending the memorial service for the victim and you appeared to be skipping as you walked back to your car after the service.”

The document also says Wellwood and his co-accused, Cameron Moffat, initially identified two victims who were not able to meet them, so they selected Proctor.

Wellwood and Moffat were 16 and 17 years old at the time, respectively. The two bound Proctor, sexually assaulted her, choked and gagged her, placed her body in a freezer. The next day they transported her body to a location in a duffle bag, before burning her body.

“According to file information, you then returned home for lunch while your co-accused went for a meal with some family members,” the document reads.

After sexually assaulting and killing Proctor, Wellwood and Moffat contacted another female asking her to come over. The document says there is speculation that the pair of killers were looking for another victim.

Victim impact statements, including one written by Landolt, were read to the court during Wellwood’s hearing.

“Although you lowered your head while listening to the victim statements near the end of the hearing, the board could not discern any visible emotion even though the statements were moving and compelling,” the document reads.

According to the decision, Wellwood still places some blame on Moffat, saying he was introduced to violent pornography by him. Wellwood also said the fact that his father was in prison for a sexual assault and murder had an impact on him that he hadn’t processed yet.

When he murdered Proctor, Wellwood was already on bail for assaulting his mother.

The decision notes Wellwood shared details of the murder with his inmates, upsetting them so much that they sought out help from counsellors. He experienced violent outbursts towards inanimate objects but said he did so as a way to channel his emotions towards something else. He is working on finding better ways to manage his emotions.

In 2011, a psychologist said Wellwood met the criteria for clinical psychopathy and sexual sadism and would require close supervision over the next 30 years or more. In July of this year, a psychologist reiterated the previous assessment and did not support releasing Wellwood.

“He’s a monster,” Landolt said. “And he was so young when it happened, it’s scary.”

The decision says Wellwood keeps Proctor in his prayers every night and that he wants to do justice to her memory. Meanwhile, Landolt and the rest of Proctor’s family hope he will not apply for parole again in May — the 10-year mark since his incarceration.

“I realize that it is his right to apply for parole but if he has absolutely nothing in place that would make him eligible, why is he allowed to proceed?” said Lucy Proctor, Kimberly’s mother, in a letter to government officials. She asks that an adjustment be made, so that inmates who have not completed requirements for release can be denied a hearing.

“Then victim’s families would not have to endure the painful process of listening again to how their loved ones died,” she said.

However, if either Moffat or Wellwood apply for parole again, the family will be there.

“I think attending means supporting Kimmy,” Landolt said. “If we’re not there, we’re not representing her and the devastation they have caused.”

shalu.mehta@goldstreamgazette.com

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