Karen Burns, front, protests outside the O.K. Industry work site along Millstream Road on Thursday, Feb. 4. The protestors have been set up twice daily since Monday, and Burns said they will keep showing up "every day for as long as it takes." The group would like to see a reform of the B.C. Mines Act, Burns said. (Dawn Gibson/News Staff)

Highlands community set to present anti-quarry argument in court Wednesday

Community Association says permit fails to consider climate change

A resident push against the Millstream Quarry are far from over, with the latest appeal from the Highlands District Community Association (HDCA) set to be heard Wednesday by B.C.’s Court of Appeal.

The appeal against quarry owner O.K. Industries, paving and asphalt company, claims the government failed to consider climate change impacts when issuing the permit for the quarry. It’s an appeal of the judicial review findings that rejected the HDCA’s claim that failure to consider climate change made the decision to issue a permit unreasonable.

READ MORE: BC Supreme Court rules Highlands quarry work can continue

The District of Highlands also appealed the B.C. Supreme Court’s January 2021 decision stating that municipal bylaws do not apply to mines since they are provincially regulated.

In October 2020 when O.K. Industries started clearing trees from the site, a Highlands bylaw officer slapped them with a cease work order for not having municipal tree cutting permits. O.K. Industries took to court to settle the dispute between jurisdictions, and on Jan. 20, the B.C. Supreme Court determined that Highlands bylaws do no apply to the Millstream Quarry as long as it’s an active mine.

PHOTOS: Protests hold firm against work on Highlands quarry site


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