Don Young, who sailed four years as a merchant mariner, hopes Canadians will use Sept. 3 to remember the contributions of the merchant navy during the Second World War. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Former merchant mariner living in Sidney hopes Canadians won’t forget

Don Young said merchant navy made a war-winning contribution

A Sidney mariner hopes Peninsula residents will take Sept. 3 — Merchant Navy Veterans Day — to reflect on the contributions of the mariners during the Second World War.

Don Young, who sailed on two British Petroleum oil tankers and an iron ore carrier between 1959 to 1963 before coming to Canada, said merchant mariners made a decisive contribution to the war.

Their efforts helped win the war, especially during its early phase, when Nazi Germany sought to starve out the United Kingdom by cutting its supply lines from other parts of the western world, including Canada.

Merchants mariners also shipped large stocks of supply from the United States to the Arctic port of Murmansk former USSR. That port was guarded by German planes and submarines based in occupied Norway and sustained Malta, which served as an unsinkable aircraft carrier in the Mediterranean that harassed and eventually strangled supply lines to German-Italian forces in North Africa.

“If those places had fallen, we wouldn’t be sitting here as we are today,” he said.

Canada’s merchant navy during the Second World consisted of non-military vessels and crews that nonetheless fought as combatants during the Battle of the Atlantic, which lasted the entirety of the war. According to Veterans Affairs Canada, 12,000 men and women served in the merchant navy, making more than 25,000 voyages. About 1,500 Canadians, including eight women, died with 59 Canadian-registered merchant ships lost.

Young said public memory often loses sight of these figures.

“It wasn’t just the loss of ships. It was the loss of lives.”

RELATED: Routine Spitfire raids of Europe isn’t something you forget

British and later American merchant mariners also suffered losses in the thousands on voyages during which they faced multiple challenges. Sailing on a mixture of old and new ships with rudimentary quarters and weapons, these sailors not only braved rough conditions of the Atlantic, but also the threat of German U-Boats stalking them like wolves stalking deer. Losses appeared especially high during the first half of the war, before superior Allied technology, air cover and industrial production turned the German hunters into the hunted.

The question of recognizing the contributions of merchant mariners gained prominence during the 1980s and 1990s, but it was not until 2003 that Canada joined other countries in making Sept. 3 a day of remembrance.

Young’s interest in the history and contributions of the merchant navy does not just spring from his own professional background, but also from personal history.

“I had relatives, who had been in the Royal Navy,” said Young, who was born in January 1939 near Newcastle-on-the-Tyne. As a child growing up during wartime, he benefited from the merchant navy. Newcastle’s location as a transportation hub near the Atlantic Ocean and status as industrial production centre in northwestern England had also made the city specifically and the area generally a target of German planes.

Young still remembers how his father hustled Young and the rest of the family including a twin brother to the air-raid shelters as searchlights, anti-aircraft fire and planes pierced the night sky.

“That was my most vivid memory of the war,” he said.

Growing up near the Atlantic also fostered a love for the sea among Young. “We used spent holidays on the seaside.”

Soon, Young knew exactly what he wanted do, telling his school’s headmaster in no uncertain term when he asked Young and his twin brother about their career plans.

“He had one twin sitting on one knee, and me on the other. And he asked, ‘what, are you going to be when you grow up? A fireman or what?’ And I said, ‘no, I’m going to be a sailor.’ From then, I had sought my sights on being at sea.”


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Sidney

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Langford racing enthusiast back in driver’s seat of life after surviving aggressive cancer

70-year-old David Smith finishes mid-pack in Canada 200 race at Western Speedway

New nurse practitioner-led medical clinic welcomes Victoria patients

Health Care on Yates expects to serve 6,800 new patients over the next three years

Central Saanich needs at least more than 500 additional daycare spaces

Report before Central Saanich says region faces a ‘chronic shortage’ of daycare spaces

MISSING: West Shore RCMP searching for 15-year-old last seen Sept. 13

Mackenzie Courchene still missing despite several tips, possible sightings, police say

Sooke RCMP searching for two people, reported missing on Sept. 10

Alannah Brooke Logan, 20, and Beau Richard Santuccione, 32, last seen on Otter Point Road

3 new deaths due to COVID-19 in B.C., 139 new cases

B.C. confirms 40 ‘historic cases,’ as well

POLL: Do you plan on allowing your children to go trick or treating this year?

This popular annual social time will look quite different this year due to COVID-19

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Comox Valley protesters send message over old-growth logging

Event in downtown Courtenay was part of wider event on Friday

VIDEO: B.C. to launch mouth-rinse COVID-19 test for kids

Test involves swishing and gargling saline in mouth and no deep-nasal swab

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Young Canadians have curtailed vaping during pandemic, survey finds

The survey funded by Heart & Stroke also found the decrease in vaping frequency is most notable in British Columbia and Ontario

B.C. teachers file Labour Relations Board application over COVID-19 classroom concerns

The application comes as B.C.’s second week of the new school year comes to a close

Most Read