Fawn season means potential for angry does

Be mindful of does and fawns, and give deer their space

Give deer their space

Give deer their space

Fawn season is in full swing but Oak Bay hasn’t seen a rise in interactions with mother deer, according to the B.C. Conservation Officer Service.

“I’m not seeing an increase in Oak Bay so I don’t see there being any change. It’s a fairly typical year,” says Peter Pauwels, conservation officer. “This type of behaviour we see more of it in area where deer have lost their fear of people and places like Oak Bay and urban areas deer get very used to people and have no fear.”

While reports remain steady to last year’s numbers, outside our borders reports of aggressive does are on the rise.

“The behaviour is becoming more common in other places of Greater Victoria it seems,” Pauwels said.

“Calls are pretty typical of an aggressive doe. Sometimes people don’t see the fawn. Just because you don’t see the fawn doesn’t mean it’s not there

Despite the reports, no deer have made contact.

“Some of them have been aggressive, chasing little dogs and walking right up to people and stamping their feet,” Pauwels said. “There’s nothing to suggest they’re posing any unusual risk to people, such as attacking people.”

Deer are particularly irritated by dogs and Pauwels recommends keeping them close and even picking up small ones if a deer is around. Once you know where an aggressive deer frequents, avoid the area.

“If there’s a situation with imminent risk to your safety, call the police,” Pauwels said, noting their office is in Langford, a significant travel distance.

“Emergency situations are for the police.”

COS focuses on responding to human wildlife conflicts and environmental violations that pose a threat to public safety and does not attend low-risk wildlife conflict incidents or instances where conflict situations can be prevented by making changes to your property or daily behaviours.

“Options are very limited on what we do on this sort of thing,” he said. “The problem tends to pass by the end of July … the complaints of this nature seem to dry up.”

Go to www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/plants-animals-ecosystems/wildlife online for more information on prevention of deer conflict.

The Capital Regional District has also created a pamphlet  available at crd.bc.ca/project/regional-deer-management-strategy online.