Housing developments continue in Royal Bay. According to the City’s recently-released draft official community plan, the population is expected to grow to roughly 27,000 by 2038, with most of the density centred around Colwood Corners and the Seaside Village at Royal Bay. (Kendra Wong/News Gazette staff)

Colwood braces for density in community plan

Colwood Corners, Seaside Village at Royal Bay expected to see most growth

The City of Colwood is expected to look quite different in 20 years.

According to the City’s recently-released draft official community plan, the population is expected to grow to roughly 27,000 by 2038, with most of the density centred around Colwood Corners and the Seaside Village at Royal Bay.

“I think that’s the reality of pretty much all of the areas is that you’re getting pressurized into growth, it’s about taking the areas where that’s best suitable,” Mayor Carol Hamilton said.

“Let’s use those corridors, let’s update the corridor areas and leave some of the other areas a little bit more natural or develop them.”

Colwood Corners is envisioned to be a city-wide and regional destination for shopping, working and gathering, with mid-rise buildings consisting of retail, office and residential units, and residential buildings of up to 12 to 15 storeys. Densities will be focused along Sooke Road, Goldstream Avenue and Wale Road east of Wilfert Road.

There are lots of opportunities for growth at the Seaside Village by Royal Bay as well, which is expected to become a secondary primary hub within the city.

The area is expected to consist of residential buildings of up to 12 storeys, low-rise buildings with retail, possible office and residential, units and stacked townhouses.

“We have this brand new opportunity at Royal Bay, that was another area that could very easily become a hub, who knows what could happen,” Hamilton said. “Would eventually a ferry bus or sea bus type-entity be possible? Certainly with population numbers increasing it would make an interesting project.”

RELATED: Colwood community plan taking shape

The official community plan, which launched in fall 2016 and is based on community input over the past year, is a guiding framework for all departments and decision-making within the city over the next 20 years. It was originally created in 2008, but has not been updated since.

Aside from density, the plan touches on a number of other objectives. Housing is also set to expand. In 2016, Colwood had 6,867 private dwellings. That number is expected to increase by 3,478 units over the next two decades, with the number of apartments set to increase by 2,305 units during the same period.

Residential areas, such as Hillside and Shoreline, and a number of others will remain family-friendly neighbourhoods. However, homeowners will have the option of adding a suite, carriage house or coach house as a mortgage helper and to create more housing options.

Other objectives in the plan include supporting rental housing and a range of non-market housing options, achieving the City’s greenhouse gas emission reduction targets, protecting topography and trees, and increased transportation options.

But Hamilton said residents shouldn’t expect to see major changes right away.

“It is just a guideline, it’s not a magic wand. We hope that we have buy-in from the people who will be helping to make and shape that change because we can wish for sure, but it’s going to take development to make it happen,” she said.

Residents can give their feedback on the plan by emailing planning@colwood.ca, phoning 250-478-5999, in person or mailing Colwood City Hall (3300 Wishart Rd.).

To review the full draft plan visit colwood.ca/makingwaves.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

kendra.wong@gold streamgazette.com

City of Colwood,Official Community Plan

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

Faulty janitorial equipment likely caused Saanich school fire

Saturday morning fire damaged roof of Strawberry Vale Elementary

Greater Victoria records highest unemployment in history with 11 per cent

Past peak was 7.8 per cent more than a decade ago, according to South Island Prosperity Partnership

Garth Homer Society in Saanich turns lemons into lemonade with online programs

Victoria disability organization sets up online programs and learning tools in wake of COVID-19

Human behaviour likely to deter birds from Esquimalt Lagoon, survey suggests

More Great Blue Herons spotted, fewer mallard ducks seen

Sidney’s Mary Winspear Centre to host a trio of acts

Aaron Pritchett, Alex Cuba and Valdy will each play four shows

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Shellfish industry get funds to clean up at Island sites and beyond

Businesses can apply to cover half of costs to clean up so-called ‘ghost gear’

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Most Read