Celebrate trees and bash the bad plants this Sunday in Uplands

Tree climbing, pest control among the demos planned for Tree Appreciation Day

Join Margaret Lidkea and the Friends of Uplands Park at Cattle Point this Sunday to help rid the park of invasive plant species. The event is part of Tree Appreciation Day.

Large, medium and small all trees get equal treatment during the annual Tree Appreciation Day and 23rd annual Community Invasive Bash on Sunday.

Still known colloquially as the Broom Bash, the annual gathering expanded to focus on invasive plants such as English ivy, Daphne laureola.

Join Oak Bay Parks staff and Friends of Uplands Park to learn about native trees and invasive trees, and plant trees and other native plants from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.

“We will be planting some trees but we will also have a display of trees that are appropriate for your yard,” said Chris Hyde-Lay, manager of parks for Oak Bay. “We’ll have a demonstration on how to plant those.”

They’ll showcase a series of different sizes and species ideal for Oak Bay residents to help maintain the tree canopy in the community. Information on pests, and demonstrations on pest control, proper pruning and even a little tree climbing will round out the Oak Bay Parks portion of the day from 10 to noon. Ron Carter will lead community tree walks.

“We’re also going to provide an opportunity for families to have fun ripping up ivy and helping their natural environment ecosystem,” said Margaret Lidkea, of Friends of Uplands Park.

From noon to 4 p.m. remove invasive plants like English ivy, Daphne laureola and Scotch broom to help the endangered Garry oak ecosystem.

Boasting one of the highest concentrations of rare and endangered plants in Canada, the park contains the remnants of a rare ecosystem complex of Garry oak meadows and woodlands, maritime meadows and vernal pools, which used to cover a much greater area in the region. Ivy in particular climbs trees and constricts growth.

Hyde-Lay encourages residents to come down and see the work done over the past few years by the District of Oak Bay, Friends of Uplands Park and volunteers.

With 14 of the rare plants listed with the federal Species at Risk Act, the municipality scored federal Habitat Stewardship Program funding for about a decade – including a three-year ongoing grant approved this summer.

The funding allows for hiring a summer crew to remove invasive species. The district also provided in-kind support and Friends of Uplands Park offered about 1,000 hours of volunteer time.

“We really want people to bring their questions,” Hyde-Lay added.

Both encourage residents to bring families, friends, gloves and loppers or pruners to join in the fun of being outside, physically active and helping the environment.  Dress appropriately for working among the trees and tools such as loppers and saws will be put to good use.

No experience is necessary, as they will train on proper removal of the plants. Refreshments are promised.

The annual tree appreciation and invasive plant pull is Sunday, Nov. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Meet at the Beach Drive entrance to Cattle Point

 

 

Just Posted

Esquimalt man arrested for child pornography

42-year-old man’s residence searched by VicPD units on Dec. 5

Christmas comes early to Willows Elementary

Oak Bay firefighters continue to give back with $5,000 donation to local elementary school

Oak Bay teen targets 1,000 toys

Toy drive for Stan Hagen Centre For Families is Dec. 15 and 16 on Oak Bay Avenue

Victoria to bid for World Cross-Country Championships

IAAF 2023 worlds could bring upwards of $10 million to region

Young girls fight STEM stigma with hackathon

Three SD62 middle schools took part in the Hackergal Hackathon

WATCH: Hundreds of gifts go out to Victoria’s Our Place patrons

The Angel Gifts Program saw 700 Christmas presents go out to the community

POLL: Are you dreaming of a white Christmas?

The rain Vancouver Island is famous for is coming down in buckets,… Continue reading

‘People talk about deep sadness:’ Scientists study climate change grief

Some call it environmental grief, some call it solastalgia — a word coined for a feeling of homesickness when home changes around you.

As protectors abandon Trump, investigation draws closer

Cohen was sentenced Wednesday to three years in prison for an array of crimes.

Senate delays start of sittings in new home, delaying start of broadcasts

The Senate and House of Commons are moving into temporary homes for the next decade as a result of long-planned and badly needed renovations to the Centre Block.

UK leader seeks EU lifeline after surviving confidence vote

EU leaders gather for a two-day summit, beginning Thursday, which will center on the Brexit negotiations.

BCHL’ers blanked by Russia at World Junior A Challenge

Canada West loses battle of the unbeaten teams in the preliminary round

French police try to catch attack suspect dead or alive

Local authorities increase death toll to three, including 13 wounded and five in serious condition

Second Canadian missing in China after questioning by authorities

Michael Spavor, founder of a non-profit that organizes cultural-exchange trips to North Korea, “is presently missing in China”

Most Read