Celebrate trees and bash the bad plants this Sunday in Uplands

Tree climbing, pest control among the demos planned for Tree Appreciation Day

Join Margaret Lidkea and the Friends of Uplands Park at Cattle Point this Sunday to help rid the park of invasive plant species. The event is part of Tree Appreciation Day.

Large, medium and small all trees get equal treatment during the annual Tree Appreciation Day and 23rd annual Community Invasive Bash on Sunday.

Still known colloquially as the Broom Bash, the annual gathering expanded to focus on invasive plants such as English ivy, Daphne laureola.

Join Oak Bay Parks staff and Friends of Uplands Park to learn about native trees and invasive trees, and plant trees and other native plants from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.

“We will be planting some trees but we will also have a display of trees that are appropriate for your yard,” said Chris Hyde-Lay, manager of parks for Oak Bay. “We’ll have a demonstration on how to plant those.”

They’ll showcase a series of different sizes and species ideal for Oak Bay residents to help maintain the tree canopy in the community. Information on pests, and demonstrations on pest control, proper pruning and even a little tree climbing will round out the Oak Bay Parks portion of the day from 10 to noon. Ron Carter will lead community tree walks.

“We’re also going to provide an opportunity for families to have fun ripping up ivy and helping their natural environment ecosystem,” said Margaret Lidkea, of Friends of Uplands Park.

From noon to 4 p.m. remove invasive plants like English ivy, Daphne laureola and Scotch broom to help the endangered Garry oak ecosystem.

Boasting one of the highest concentrations of rare and endangered plants in Canada, the park contains the remnants of a rare ecosystem complex of Garry oak meadows and woodlands, maritime meadows and vernal pools, which used to cover a much greater area in the region. Ivy in particular climbs trees and constricts growth.

Hyde-Lay encourages residents to come down and see the work done over the past few years by the District of Oak Bay, Friends of Uplands Park and volunteers.

With 14 of the rare plants listed with the federal Species at Risk Act, the municipality scored federal Habitat Stewardship Program funding for about a decade – including a three-year ongoing grant approved this summer.

The funding allows for hiring a summer crew to remove invasive species. The district also provided in-kind support and Friends of Uplands Park offered about 1,000 hours of volunteer time.

“We really want people to bring their questions,” Hyde-Lay added.

Both encourage residents to bring families, friends, gloves and loppers or pruners to join in the fun of being outside, physically active and helping the environment.  Dress appropriately for working among the trees and tools such as loppers and saws will be put to good use.

No experience is necessary, as they will train on proper removal of the plants. Refreshments are promised.

The annual tree appreciation and invasive plant pull is Sunday, Nov. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Meet at the Beach Drive entrance to Cattle Point

 

 

Just Posted

UPDATE: Father on trial for murder describes being ‘tackled’ and ‘stabbed’ in Oak Bay apartment

Oak Bay father takes stand in his defense for December 2017 deaths of young daughters

Province rejects criticism from Saanich councillor over McKenzie Interchange

Transportation ministry says project will ‘significantly lower’ greenhouse gas emissions

Police rule out foul play in death of man found in Saanich

The B.C. Coroners Service will now conduct an investigation

West Shore RCMP snag suspected thief with bait bike

GPS-equipped bike leads police to arrest suspect in Langford

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of Aug. 23

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Should there be a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers?

We’ve all heard them, and most likely cursed them under our breath.… Continue reading

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

B.C. music teacher accused of sexual misconduct involving girls

Police believe other victims could be out there after the arrest of Lamar Victor Alviar

Most Read