Juno Award-nominated Snotty Nose Rez Kids bring their Indigenous hip hop message to the Capital Ballroom in June.

Hip hop duo weave important Indigenous tales

Northern B.C.’s Snotty Nose Rez Kids, here June 7, getting cultural message out to a broad audience

Snotty Nose Rez Kids bring the long awaited Trapline Tour to the Capital Ballroom on June 7.

Known for high energy, electrifying live shows, this hip hop duo from the Hailsa Nation of Kitamaat Village in Northwest B.C. are Darren “Young D” Metz and Quinton “Yung Trybez” Nyce.

Snotty Nose Rez Kids are an important and vital voice, not just within the underground hip hop scene but for the North American musical landscape. Channeling the experiences of Indigenous people – their anger, pride, sadness and joy – they share the stories of Indigeneity to a wider audience without once sacrificing or compromising their own narrative. The name Snotty Nose Rez Kids itself deconstructs a well-worn stereotype; stripping it down and reclaiming it with pride.

SNRK’s two 2017 releases, a self-titled album and Average Savage, led to them being shortlisted for the 2018 Polaris Prize. Now they return with Trapline; an 18-track, trap-heavy offering that is powerful, political and potent.

READ ALSO: Take a bite out of Victoria during YYJ Eats

Hip hop’s role, at its root, is to speak for those who may feel unheard; to give power back to those who feel powerless. SNRK and their self-described Indigenous Trap speak for the land, the water and the traditions; for their ancestors and contemporaries, honouring what has gone before and what is now. Current track “Boujee Natives” is both empowered and empowering, giving shout-outs to First Nations artists, creators and dreamers, those who weave traditional ways into modern living.

While much of their lyricism is rooted in West Coast imagery, it transcends its geographical location to become a rallying cry for resistance across the continent. By choosing to tell their story of Indigenous pride, and the storytelling and spiritual traditions it is rooted in, SNRK educate their non-Indigenous audiences in the experiences faced by First Nations peoples today, further opening up the dialogue of and issues surrounding reconciliation in Canada today.

The duo’s 2019 festival dates span the summer and the country, with B.C. appearances being limited to August’s Starbelly Jam and Cumberland Wild so my advice is to catch them early at The Cap. Tickets are $15, available from Lyle’s Place and TicketWeb.ca. All tickets for the original May 3 date will be honoured.



editor@mondaymag.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Cycslists were all smiles during ninth Tour de Victoria

More than 2,100 cyclists participated

‘I’m just absolutely disgusted’: Husband furious after Const. Beckett’s killer gets day parole

Kenneth Fenton was sentenced to prison after he fatally struck Const. Sarah Beckett’s cruiser

Police investigating incident in Saanich neighbourhood

Neighbours tell Black Press Media that a body has been found, but police remain tight-lipped.

Panels proliferate in Victoria’s Commercial Alley Art Gallery

City artist Fern Long’s themed works will be on display through August 2020

Colwood man takes on Ride to Conquer Cancer for 11th year in a row

Team Finn has raised almost $3 million for BC Cancer Foundation

VIDEO: Langley Ribfest met with protesters

Groups that oppose the event for various reasons plan to be on site each of the three days.

Canadians killed in Afghanistan honoured during emotional dedication ceremony

One-hundred-fifty-eight Canadian soldiers died during the mission

It’s snow joke: Up to 30 cm of snow expected to fall in northeastern B.C.

Alaska Highway, Fort Nelson to be hit with August snowstorm, according to Environment Canada

Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Sea to Sky Gondola carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people every day during the summer season

Helicopter-riding dog Mr. Bentley now featured on cans of new B.C.-made beer

Partial proceeds from every pack go to Children’s Wish

PHOTOS: Weapons seized at Portland right-wing rally, counterprotests

Not all who gathered Saturday were with right-wing groups or antifa

Ferries employees participating in Denman Island cleanup for plastic-shedding ferry

The cleanup comes a few weeks after one organized by residents of the Island

Discussion on grief and loss between Stephen Colbert, Anderson Cooper goes viral

The exchange includes emotional question from Cooper, and outlook on grief as a child

Toronto activist calling on federal parties to nominate more black candidates

Fewer than 20 black Canadians have been nominated so far, including some Liberal MPs seeking re-election

Most Read