HeroWork reveals, celebrates renovations underway at Indigenous Perspectives Society’s Langford site

The sound of drums and melodic voices fill the air as Lizz Brooks leads the opening ceremony at Indigenous Perspectives Society. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)The sound of drums and melodic voices fill the air as Lizz Brooks leads the opening ceremony at Indigenous Perspectives Society. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
Trevor Botkin is the executive director at HeroWork, the charity responsible for the renovation of the Indigenous Perspectives Society. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)Trevor Botkin is the executive director at HeroWork, the charity responsible for the renovation of the Indigenous Perspectives Society. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
Audiences enjoy a speech as they reflect on reconciliation two days after Canada’s first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)Audiences enjoy a speech as they reflect on reconciliation two days after Canada’s first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
Eddy Charlie (left) and Kristin Spray are the local organizers of Orange Shirt Day. Charlie said the space will be a place where Indigenous Peoples feel like they belong. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)Eddy Charlie (left) and Kristin Spray are the local organizers of Orange Shirt Day. Charlie said the space will be a place where Indigenous Peoples feel like they belong. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

Through radical renovations, HeroWork is back at it again.

On Oct. 2, The non-profit foundation celebrated a project currently underway for Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS), a much-needed renovation of their headquarters in Langford.

HeroWork plans to renew the training facility for IPS to accommodate more people and is working to add washrooms and offices, along with improving lighting, soundproofing, and airflow. There will also be an overall redesign of the interior, exterior and landscaping.

“We wanted to produce a space that provides that cultural relevance to people that come here,” Paul Latour, HeroWork’s founder, said at the reveal. “After so many years, decades and centuries of trying to suppress culture, identity and people – to be able to be part of that change is an honour.”

The project is inspired by Indigenous peoples’ connection with the natural world, culture, values, and lifestyles, a release said. Eddy Charlie, a Kuper Island residential school survivor who started the Victoria chapter of Orange Shirt Day with his friend Kristin Spray, said at the reveal the newly renovated space will be another place where Indigenous people feel like they belong.

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Organizers and volunteers came together to bring light to the project and to empower IPS while addressing the importance of reconciliation.

The organization said that the need for reconciliation is evident in the multi-generational trauma caused by the legacy of residential schools and continues through the prejudice and discrimination that Indigenous people continue to face today.


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