Arctic

Cmdr. Corey Gleason, Commanding Officer of the Royal Canadian Navy’s newest Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship, HMCS Harry DeWolf, uses binoculars as he looks out from the bridge while travelling on the Salish Sea from Vancouver to Victoria, B.C., Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. A senior Canadian military official says Russia has started sending long-range bombers back across the Arctic toward North America following a pause during the early months of its war in Ukraine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Russia resuming bomber, submarine patrols near North America after pause: Norad

Russian submarines operating off both coasts, showing ability to strike Canada and the United States

 

Ships are framed by pieces of melting sea ice in Frobisher Bay in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Wednesday, July 31, 2019. Scientists are telling the global climate conference in Egypt that the loss of summer Arctic sea ice is now inevitable. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Climate conference hears loss of Arctic summer sea ice now inevitable by 2050

Expected to happen at least once by 2050, this would spell the end of an entire ecosystem

 

Ice floats in Slidre Fjord outside the Eureka Weather Station on Ellesmere Island, Nvt., Monday, July 24, 2006. While the Arctic is better known for blankets of snow than rain clouds, new research suggests the number of rainy days in the region will roughly double by the end of this century.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

‘Arrival of a new Arctic’: Study predicts Arctic rainy days will double by 2100

More frequent and intense rainfall expected to increase permafrost melt and speed up sea-ice loss

 

Nunavut Premier P.J. Akeeagok, left to right, Northwest Territories Premier Caroline Cochrane, Yukon Premier Sandy Silver, and moderator Dr. Whitney Lackenbauer, Canada Research Chair in the Study of the Canadian North at Trent University at the Arctic Circle forum in Nuuk, Greenland are shown in this handout image provided by Government of the Northwest Territories as they take part in a panel discussion on Healthy Communities. Canada’s three territorial premiers stressed the need to invest in northern communities and include northerners in decision-making at an Arctic Circle gathering in Greenland that concluded earlier this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Government of the Northwest Territories

‘Nothing about us without us’: Northern premiers address Arctic Circle forum

Trio lead panel on sovereignty and security in Canada’s North

Nunavut Premier P.J. Akeeagok, left to right, Northwest Territories Premier Caroline Cochrane, Yukon Premier Sandy Silver, and moderator Dr. Whitney Lackenbauer, Canada Research Chair in the Study of the Canadian North at Trent University at the Arctic Circle forum in Nuuk, Greenland are shown in this handout image provided by Government of the Northwest Territories as they take part in a panel discussion on Healthy Communities. Canada’s three territorial premiers stressed the need to invest in northern communities and include northerners in decision-making at an Arctic Circle gathering in Greenland that concluded earlier this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Government of the Northwest Territories
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg at the NATO Summit in Madrid on June 29, 2022. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will host the first-ever visit of a NATO secretary general to Canada’s Arctic this week. The visit by NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg comes as the transatlantic military alliance has started to put more emphasis on protecting its northern flank. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

NATO chief’s first visit to Canadian Arctic to focus on Russia, climate change

Canada has long opposed greater NATO involvement in the Arctic

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg at the NATO Summit in Madrid on June 29, 2022. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will host the first-ever visit of a NATO secretary general to Canada’s Arctic this week. The visit by NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg comes as the transatlantic military alliance has started to put more emphasis on protecting its northern flank. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Landfills and climate change increasing polar bear-human conflicts in Arctic: report

Climate change diminishing food supply for bears, while making the Arctic more hospitable for humans

A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Northern Affairs minister Dan Vandal rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, June 9, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s ‘flag war’ with Denmark over tiny Arctic island set to end peacefully with deal

Hans Island, a barren rock west of Greenland, will be divided equally after longstanding dispute

Northern Affairs minister Dan Vandal rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, June 9, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
A photo of ice and snowy road conditions in Greater Victoria, taken Jan. 14, 2020. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)

Arctic winds to bring near-record cold temperatures to Victoria, B.C.

Wind chill could fall as low as – 20 C before rising Wednesday, Dec. 29

A photo of ice and snowy road conditions in Greater Victoria, taken Jan. 14, 2020. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
A droplet of water falls from an iceberg delivered by members of Arctic Basecamp is placed on show near the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. The four ton block of ice, originally part of a larger glacier, was brought from Greenland to Glasgow by climate scientists from Arctic Basecamp as a statement to world leaders of the scale of the climate crisis and a visible reminder of what Arctic warming means for the planet. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Study suggests Arctic to see more rain than snow earlier than expected

Researchers say a rainy North would also have devastating consequences for people and wildlife

A droplet of water falls from an iceberg delivered by members of Arctic Basecamp is placed on show near the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. The four ton block of ice, originally part of a larger glacier, was brought from Greenland to Glasgow by climate scientists from Arctic Basecamp as a statement to world leaders of the scale of the climate crisis and a visible reminder of what Arctic warming means for the planet. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
Cory Trepanier captures Hudson Bay. (Ryan Bray photo)

Travel to the Arctic this Saturday from the comfort of your home

Trio of award-winning films about Canada’s north stream free on YouTube on July 17

Cory Trepanier captures Hudson Bay. (Ryan Bray photo)
A south view of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf breaking apart is seen from Ward Hunt Island, Nunavut, in an Aug. 20, 2011, handout photo. The remote area in the northern reach of the Nunavut Territory, has seen ice cover shrink from over 4 metres thick in the 1950s to complete loss, according to scientists, during recent years of record warming. Scientists are urging the federal government to permanently protect a vast stretch of Canada’s remotest High Arctic called the Last Ice Area. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-CEN/Laval University, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Scientists urge permanent protection of Last Ice Area in Canada’s High Arctic

Just last July, 40 per cent of the area’s Milne Ice Shelf collapsed within two days

A south view of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf breaking apart is seen from Ward Hunt Island, Nunavut, in an Aug. 20, 2011, handout photo. The remote area in the northern reach of the Nunavut Territory, has seen ice cover shrink from over 4 metres thick in the 1950s to complete loss, according to scientists, during recent years of record warming. Scientists are urging the federal government to permanently protect a vast stretch of Canada’s remotest High Arctic called the Last Ice Area. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-CEN/Laval University, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
The midnight sun shines over the ice covered waters near Resolute bay at 1:30am as seen from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent Saturday, July 12, 2008. The top of the world is turning upside down, according to the first overall assessment of Canada’s Arctic Ocean. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Frozen North gone forever: Study of Arctic Ocean shows top of the world changing

It’s 33 per cent less salty than in 2003 and about 30 per cent more acidic

The midnight sun shines over the ice covered waters near Resolute bay at 1:30am as seen from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent Saturday, July 12, 2008. The top of the world is turning upside down, according to the first overall assessment of Canada’s Arctic Ocean. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The federal government is expected to approve international measures this week that would reduce the environmental impact of Arctic shipping but would cost northern families hundreds of dollars a year. Ships are frames by pieces of melting sea ice in Frobisher Bay in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Wednesday, July 31, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada expected to support heavy fuel ban in Arctic despite costs to northerners

Transport Canada says higher fuel prices will also affect mining companies and governments

The federal government is expected to approve international measures this week that would reduce the environmental impact of Arctic shipping but would cost northern families hundreds of dollars a year. Ships are frames by pieces of melting sea ice in Frobisher Bay in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Wednesday, July 31, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick