LETTER: Humans the real threat to bird populations

The article “Greater Victoria group calls for cats to be licensed” introduces the Victoria Natural History Society’s idea of licensing cats. As a cat owner, I would support licensing cats with well thought-out details.

RELATED: Victoria Natural History Society asks district to keep cats under control

Licensing pet cats would be a good idea, providing that the program ensures they are vaccinated and spayed/neutered. In addition, the revenue from licensing cats must fund sterilization and other programs addressing cat overpopulation and welfare.

RELATED: Leash your cat or face a $150 fine in Victoria

However, cats are not dogs. Controlling cats in the same way we control dogs is impractical. If confined indoors or physically restrained outside, most cats become frustrated even depressed, which leads to bad behaviour or health problems. Forcing cats to stay indoors or physically restraining them is not only cruel, but also will condemn more abandoned cats to death in already over-populated pound and shelter. While the concerns of bird lovers are understandable, harming cats is not the right solution.

RELATED: Cat champion recognized for saving hundreds of felines

Some blame cats for declining bird populations. Yes, some cats kill some birds, but let’s not forget that cats kill far more rodents than birds. Victoria has proudly become the second rattiest city in B.C. With fewer cats going after rats, expect more rats. Then what do we do? Use poison to kill rats?

RELATED: Brown Booby seabird a rare sight in Victoria

RELATED: Vancouver Island is home to some of the ‘rattiest’ cities in B.C.

The truth is humans cause many more bird deaths by cutting down trees, using toxic lawn and garden chemicals, air pollution and climate change. Yet we try to change cats’ natural behaviour rather than correct human mistakes. It would be far more useful to eliminate poisonous lawn and garden chemicals which not only kill birds and pets but damage our health.

RELATED: ‘Heart of the city’ tree comes down in Victoria

RELATED: B.C. VIEWS: Polluted logic plagues pesticide bylaws

Your newspaper had a survey on cat licensing. The question was too simple and not well considered. I suggest you conduct another more useful survey with several questions:

• Should pet cats be licensed?

• What should be included with cat licensing?

• Vaccination

• Spay/neutering

• Keeping cats indoor

• Walking cats outdoor on leashes

• Allowing cats to go out unleashed

• Should licensing revenue be dedicated to vaccinating and sterilizing cats?

Lanlin Bu

Saanich

Just Posted

Victoria cannabis dispensaries are busy in their first days of legal operation

The Cloud Nine Collective and The Original FARM opened their doors on April 15

Island cycling series boosts youth race schedule

New series creates opportunity for more youth competition

Colwood wins award for Sustainable Infrastructure Replacement Plan

Plan wins Award of Excellence in Government Finance

Autism support dog helps Langford boy hold his head high

Family shares story for Autism Awareness Month

WATCH: Movie star and PACE alum Calum Worthy talks musical theatre and his career

“American Vandal” and “Austin and Ally” actor has been returning to the program for over 20 years

POLL: How often does your family use BC Ferries?

Navigating the lineups for BC Ferries is a way of life for… Continue reading

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for the week of April 16

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

$6K raised in one day’s time for family of woman gunned down in Penticton

GoFundMe launched for family of Darlene Knippelberg, to pay for funeral costs and other expenses

Seven tips to travel safely this Easter long weekend

An average of three people are killed, and hundreds more injured, each Easter long weekend in B.C.

Parents say Austrian climber missing in Banff National Park ‘lived his dream’

David Lama, Hansjorg Auer and American climber Jess Roskelley have been missing since Wednesday

Six months after legalization, high prices and supply issues boost illicit pot market

It has been six months since Canada became the first industrialized country to legalize recreational cannabis

Seattle’s 4-20 ‘protestival’ enjoys tolerance, some support – and B.C. could do the same

Seattle’s Hempfest a large-scale occasions with vendors, prominent musical acts and thousands of attendees

B.C. mountain biker sent home from hospital twice, despite broken vertebrae

Released in Maple Ridge to go home with three fractured vertebrae

Most Read