Letter: Beware statistics in infill discussion

Rational, reasoned, even passionate views welcome in infill discussion with an eye to progressive and positive future for Oak Bay

Re: Residents don’t want infill, Your View, Oak Bay News Sept. 16

I read yet again, the hyperbole that envelops one of many current issues of interest to the residents of Oak Bay, infill housing. In response to the writer’s piece, “Residents don’t want infill,” I take some solace from the quote “Statistics are no substitute for judgment.” (Henry Clay).

At the recent Residential Infill Housing Strategy open house, both positive and negative comments arose from the meetings, and I along with I’m sure many residents, applaud the beginnings of open and transparent consideration to this very important issue.

An issue that requires some significant levels of address.

One speaker during a session provided an eloquent explanation of our responsibility for those who call this great community home.

We are not simply residents, we are stewards of this municipality and moving forward, we have an obligation to consider those who might have the benefit of living here.

To default to the status quo, and rebuke even the thought of meaningful discussion on elements of infill housing, is in effect moving backwards.

My current home of 25 years in Oak Bay would not have been but for some need, foresight and development in the Henderson area many decades ago.

This is not to say there are not good points of view on both sides of this discussion and it would be a folly exercise not to listen intently to all that is offered.

While ensuring the historical and unique nature of Oak Bay is considered, instead of taking the “sky is falling” approach, let’s listen to rational, reasoned, and yes, passionate views, with the eye to progressive and positive changes that can help shape Oak Bay into the future.

To do any less is a disservice to the community we currently enjoy.

Kevin Hall

Oak Bay

 

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