Editorial: Public shows its appetite for the arts

Well-received ArtsAlive community arts program shows steady growth

The passion Oak Bay has for art is well demonstrated, not only in its many galleries and artists, but also in its multiple art clubs and well-attended special events.

Until recently, though, public art was sorely lacking.

Enter Oak Bay arts laureate Barbara Adams and ArtsAlive, Oak Bay Parks, Recreation and Culture’s annual public sculpture program.

Three years ago, Adams brightened Oak Bay streets with a summer show of borrowed artworks and three pianos, painted by local artists and set out to delight both visual and aural senses.

Last year, the pianos returned, along with a dozen sculptures in prominent Oak Bay locations.

This past year also saw the purchase of Chris Paul’s Salish Sea sculpture at Oak Bay Marina – one of the works from that inaugural year. And just last month, the district agreed to purchase its second piece, Rebirth, a distinctive whale bone-inspired piece by artist David Hunwick at Oak Bay Avenue at Foul Bay Road.

The growth and evolution of the ArtsAlive program is significant, and can be attributed in large part to Adams, with her infectious passion for the arts.

Seeking to keep this year’s artworks on the street beyond summer, Adams asked local businesses and organization to sponsor individual works for a year-long exhibit, and the community quickly answered the call. Thirteen artworks are dotted throughout the municipality, representing a wide array of artists and styles. People can vote for their favourite and the most popular work will be considered for possible purchase by the municipality.

Thanks to the artistic talents of Jonathan Gleed, Peter van Giesen, Dorothy Jarvis and Robert Amos, pop-up pianos will also be installed once again at Turkey Head, Loon Bay Park, Cattle Point and Estevan village.

Last week, two full buses toured art lovers around the district to view this year’s sculptures and meet with the artists, demonstrating art’s importance here, and its ability to draw visitors from further afield to enjoy all we have to offer.

This welcome reception and the steady growth of ArtsAlive shows art can indeed be a powerful tool.

 

Just Posted

Oak Bay man designer behind Canucks’ retro jersey

Jeremie White was 20 years old when he told Canucks assistant GM Brian Burke he had a design

BC Farmers’ Market Trail a one-stop virtual guide to the goods

New website assembles, profiles 145+ farmers’ markets throughout B.C.

Westshore Rebels game postponed due to poor air quality conditions

Games expected to continue the following week

Saanich police investigating sexual assault in broad daylight

Social media lit up with accusations incident took place at Regina Park tent city

Swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

Five things to do in Greater Victoria this weekend

Puppy yoga, horses, cars, water guns and more make up this weekend’s list of events to see

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights are misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Most Read