Editorial: Here’s hoping Trudeau continues inclusive approach

A lot of eyes are turned toward prime minister designate Justin Trudeau these days, from people of various political stripes.

A lot of eyes are turned toward prime minister designate Justin Trudeau these days, from people of various political stripes.

Among their hopes is that Trudeau will continue the promise of co-operation he voiced during an election campaign that was dogged by negative messaging.

The country has for too long been plagued by politics of confrontation, creating an “us and them” mentality that in the end does little more than further polarize people of different perspectives.

Canada was, however, built by people of different perspectives, backgrounds, religions and ethnicities, people who all have something to contribute to the national view.

Trudeau took a good first step last week, welcoming Green leader Elizabeth May to be part of the Canadian delegation to next month’s United Nations summit on climate change in Paris, along with the provincial premiers.

It has been suggested that he’ll also welcome NDP leader Thomas Mulcair and Conservative leader Stephen Harper or his replacement, should they wish to participate.

Locally, our re-elected NDP MP, Murray Rankin, is also hopeful that the lack of Liberal red on the Island won’t lead to a partisan approach to fulfilling campaign promises and previous federal commitments.

In the Victoria riding especially, areas of crucial local importance include major infrastructure projects underway or set to start, transportation concerns and the homelessness and affordable housing issue.

Here’s hoping that a less overtly partisan government is on the horizon.

 

As Rankin notes in today’s Oak Bay News, “We don’t have to be disagreeable. We don’t have to be taking the tone we took with Mr. Harper … this is a different group so one wants to make sure we give them a chance.”