Editorial: Do your part for a safe holiday

Don’t let one stupid decision make you the cause of someone else's tragedy

Don’t drink and drive. Sad that it must be said every year. Even more disheartening that the message just doesn’t get through.

Every year, in nearly every community, police, victims, families and others plead with the public not to drive while impaired.

And every year, in nearly every community, at least one incident will be reported of a motor vehicle collision that could have been avoided had alcohol not been involved.

Far too often, that incident will have tragic results. Families will be destroyed. All for the sake of saving $20.

“I just live around the corner.” “I don’t want to leave my car at the bar.” “I need my vehicle in the morning.” “I don’t have money for a cab.”

All excuses police have heard before. None of them legitimate.

Police in Oak Bay and across the province are into their Christmas season crackdown, promising to be ever-vigilant in catching impaired drivers.

It’s sad to think that people will consider getting behind the wheel after a night of consuming liquor or drugs, despite constant reports of deaths caused from such acts.

ICBC notes that impaired driving is still the leading cause of car crashes in B.C. and 27 per cent of vehicle crash fatalities are related to impaired driving.

According to Statistics Canada, impaired driving is the leading cause of criminal death in the country.

Let that sink in for a minute. The leading cause of criminal death in Canada is also so easily preventable.

So, before picking up those keys at the end of the staff holiday party, or a night out with friends, keep this in mind: Someone’s family will be destroyed by an impaired driver this Christmas season.

Don’t let one stupid decision make you the cause.