Demand referendum on sewage treatment

Oak Bay residents should have a say in how our tax dollars should be spent on mega projects such as the Uplands sewer separation project

It is time that all the residents of Oak Bay have a say in how our tax dollars should be spent on mega projects such as the Uplands sewer separation project (separation of the storm water and domestic sewer).

In January 2010 council voted against proceeding with the Low Pressure System (LPS) as a result of lobbying by some Uplands residents against a LPS costing $7.6 million which was recommended by municipal staff and the highly respected engineering firm hired by the municipality.

This resulted in Oak Bay losing approved  federal and provincial grants of $5.1 million.  A duel Gravity System, which the Uplands residents preferred would have cost Oak Bay taxpayers $30.7 million or an average of about $400 additional taxes per year.

I have been advised by the municipality that the mayor will likely be asking the province and CRD for an extension to the time by which the separation has to be completed.

Also, l am told that the separation project will be a Gravity System and no consideration will be given to a LPS. This being the case, the cost to Oak Bay taxpayers could be $40 plus million. Combined  with the sewage treatment project, which is another Blue Bridge, if it ever happens, could increase current taxes by an average of $1,200 or more per year.

Should this project proceed as planned, it will contribute to this community becoming unaffordable for many residents.

Prior to the Nov. 15 election, taxpayers should be asking the candidates, particularly those who were on council in 2010 and voted for rejecting the LPS, for an explanation and for their position on this very important issue.

Taxpayers should demand a referendum on whether they prefer a Low Pressure System at a cost of likely $10 million or a $40-plus million Gravity System demanded by the Uplands residents.

Something to consider is that only six per cent of Oak Bay households are in Uplands and of those  one-third do not require separation.

Claire Eraut

Oak Bay

 

Just Posted

Almost four of 10 Canadians have unlimited internet data at home

Fifty-four per cent say they telecommute at least sometimes

New Carnarvon Park field-house could cost $4.3M

Both tennis and pickleball courts are included in new draft plan

Esquimalt needs urgent health care facility, mayor says

A severe doctor shortage is leaving Esquimalt residents scrambling for health care

Student Voice: Saanich students launch competitive robotics team

The Reynolds Reybots plan to share their skills with middle schools

What are the worst parking spots in Victoria?

We are looking for the worst places in the city to park and need your opinion

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Women’s March returns across the U.S. amid shutdown and controversy

The original march in 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, drew hundreds of thousands of people

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

No winning ticket in $10 million Lotto Max jackpot

No win in Friday night’s draw means the next Lotto Max draw will be approximately $17 million

Most Read