A Nanaimo man was handed a jail sentence of more than two and a half years after pleading guilty to sexual touching of a minor and a number of child pornography-related charges. (NEWS BULLETIN file)

A Nanaimo man was handed a jail sentence of more than two and a half years after pleading guilty to sexual touching of a minor and a number of child pornography-related charges. (NEWS BULLETIN file)

Vancouver Island man sentenced for sexual touching of a child

Tyrone James Robert Morrisey given 989 days in jail for incident that took place in Ladysmith

A Nanaimo man was handed a jail sentence of more than two and a half years after pleading guilty to sexual touching of a minor and a number of child pornography-related charges.

Tyrone James Robert Morrisey, 34, who has a previous child pornography possession conviction, pleaded guilty Friday in provincial court in Nanaimo to charges of possession of child pornography, importing and distributing child pornography and touching of a minor for a sexual purpose. The case stemmed from a Jan. 13 incident in Ladysmith involving a six-year-old boy whose identity is protected.

Basil McCormick, Crown counsel, and Chris Churchill, Morrisey’s counsel, made a joint submission where both agreed on sentencing and presented it to Judge Ronald Lamperson. The judge sentenced Morrisey, who has been in custody since his arrest this past February, to an additional 989 days in jail.

During sentencing, it was revealed that Morrisey was using a mobile instant messaging application to share images of child pornography. The authorities were alerted and a Ladysmith IP address was identified. RCMP conducted surveillance and arrested Morrisey on Feb. 8. Two cellphones were seized and searched, yielding approximately 700 videos and thousands of images, many depicting children who appeared to be between two and seven years old.

Included were images of Morrisey placing his genitals touching the boy’s body parts. Police determined the images were taken Jan. 13.

Churchill said that Morrisey had a hard upbringing. He never knew his father and his mother abused drugs. He was subject to abusive foster parent situations and raised by his grandparents. He was allegedly sexually abused between the ages of seven and nine.

Addressing the court, Morrisey tearfully apologized for the damage he had done.

Morrisey must adhere to a number of conditions. He must submit a DNA order and must register as a sex offender. He is prohibited from using the internet or digital network, except for purposes of employment, and will be forbidden from being near schools, swimming pools and anywhere children gather unless in the presence of someone approved by officials.



reporter@nanaimobulletin.com

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