Spend on potholes, not plug-ins says Oak Bay resident

Smaller roads typically patched, not repaved

When Kelvin Russell opened the Oak Bay News to find a picture of Mayor Nils Jensen with the district’s new electric vehicle charging station, at a cost of $2,500 to the district, all he could think about was potholes.

“It’s falling apart, the road is,” Russell said. “It’s going into decay.”

Russell has owned his house on Lulie Street, between Cranmore Road and Bowker Avenue since 1997, and says he sees the road getting worse every year. The street has no sidewalks so the road is shared by pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles.

The charging station was partially paid for out of a provincial grant specifically for the station, but that’s not good enough, Russell said.

“It’s public money no matter where it came from. … It’s an absolute joke.”

After last winter, Russell called the municipality and public works crews came and patched up the potholes. This year, the street is once again covered in multiple potholes.

“Public works are constantly going around and picking up these sorts of complaints that come in,” said Dave Marshall, director of engineering for Oak Bay.

As complaints come in, the district makes sure to go around and patch up bad potholes. There is also a pavement management program being implemented that will address the worst roads in Oak Bay over a five-year period, but Marshall said it will likely focus on major roads.

Roads are being evaluated and a list of the worst roads is being compiled. Lulie St. is not on the list.

Smaller roads are addressed usually only after a complaint, and then generally with patching. Marshall said residents often don’t want roads repaved because the fresh pavement promotes speeding.

“We have some roads that are quite bad in the municipality from a visual, esthetic point of view, but … the residents don’t want the roads touched,” Marshall said.

“There’s more to it than just looking at the physical conditions of the road,” he added.

Coun. John Herbert, chair of the district’s public works committee, said he didn’t know if Lulie Street was on the list for patching, but he would put in a call to have someone take a look. He said at this time of year it can be difficult to do a permanent fix, due to the rain.

“They often do a temporary fix, which sometimes ends up making a bump rather than a pothole,” Herbert said.

“We’re not spending enough on roads, there’s no question about it.”

Herbert said approximately $300,000 a year is spent on road upgrades and he believes at that rate the roads of Oak Bay get progressively worse every year, rather than better.

“Roads reach a point that if you repair them at this point, you get a long life out of them. If you miss that point and let them go further, you’re usually having to rebuild them at much greater expense.”

“On the other hand, you’ve got to recognize that Oak Bay is a little municipality. One per cent on taxes is $150,000 or $160,000. … So it’s quite a difference.”

Russell said he’ll be calling about the road again this year, but he’d still rather see it repaved than patched up again.

“We’re paying property taxes like the others,” Russell said.

Concerns over road conditions can be directed to the municipal hall at 250-598-3311.

 

 

 

Just Posted

Victoria People’s Party candidate says campaign signs stolen around city

PPC candidate Alyson Culbert says she finds theft ‘disturbing’

Sidney could take additional action around speculation tax

Council to consider steps later this fall after staff review of provincial statistics

VIDEO: Greater Victoria, here’s the news you missed this weekend

Andrew Berry trial nears end, Victoria joins tree-planting pledge and more

Three second-half goals lead Cavalry over Victoria’s Pacific FC

Cavalry FC downed Pacific FC 4-1 on Sunday in Canadian Premiere League action

Island music trivia tournament a hit on World Alzheimer’s Day

More than $13,000 raised by people naming that tune

PHOTOS: Steller sea lion with plastic around neck rescued on Vancouver Island

Rescue staff determined the plastic band cut the protected animal’s neck approximately two inches

B.C. VIEWS: School officials join fact-free ‘climate strike’

Students, public get distorted picture of greenhouse gases

Handgun crackdown, health spending and transit plans latest campaign promises

Friday was the end of a busy week on the campaign trail

B.C. woman photographs massive ant swarm on Abbotsford driveway

She asked what the ants were doing? The answer: war

Iconic 90s TV show ‘Friends’ celebrates 25th anniversary

The iconic, decade-long television show aired its first episode 25 years ago today

Most Read