Crews drill and take samples from Interurban Road near Camosun College. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)

Sewer work will bring disruption to Interurban Rail Trail

Pipeline will connect Esquimalt’s McLoughlin Point with Hartland Landfill in Saanich

A section of pipe carrying sludge as part of the regional wastewater treatment project will run underneath a trail in rural Saanich.

Mayor Richard Atwell said the yet-to-be-selected contractors will dig up a section of the Interurban Rail Trail to accommodate the pipeline connecting the proposed treatment plant at Esquimalt’s McLoughlin Point with the future residual treatment facility at Saanich’s Hartland Landfill.

“We were also able to get some confirmation from the CRD [Capital Regional District] project board that the pipeline that is going from the sewage project is going underneath the Interurban Rail Trail,” said Atwell, who expressed hope that the work once completed will improve the trail for users of various kinds including cyclists.

The overall project consists out of three components: the treatment plant; the residual treatment facility; and the conveyance system for piping the wastewater.

Crews earlier this fall were drilling some 68 holes, including 52 in Saanich, to learn more about subsurface conditions along the proposed route of what the CRD calls the residual solid conveyance Line. It actually includes two pipes along with four or five pumping stations. The two pipes will run in a common trench, where possible.

CRD officials have promised to work with Saanich staff and community members once construction of the actual pipeline begins. Plans call for the creation of a Saanich community liaison committee expected to be in place by the end of this year prior to construction in the spring of 2018.

The first pipeline – 20 centimetres wide and 18.5 kilometres long – will transport residual solids. The second pipe – 35 centimetres wide and 11.5 kilometres long – will return the liquid removed from the residual solids during the treatment process to the Marigold pumping station. From there it will travel to the wastewater treatment plant through the existing collection system.

Andy Orr, a CRD spokesperson, said the project will affect about 3.5 kilometres of the trail.

No budget for that portion of the project is available. Overall, the total cost of the wastewater treatment project is $765 million.

“We anticipate construction starting in the summer of 2018 and taking approximately 2 years to complete,” said Orr. “Completion of the Project is planned for early 2020.”

CRD officials have promised to work with Saanich staff and community members once construction of the actual pipeline begins. Plans call for the creation of a Saanich Community Liaison Committee expected to be in place by the end of this year prior to the start of construction.

Just Posted

Speculation tax forces sale of Oak Bay’s ‘Tulip House’

Bob and Jan Fleming selling their retirement home famous for its thousands of tulips

New dance studio opening in Saanich

Saturday’s grand opening of Arthur Murray Dance Centre will include free lessons and a cocktail party

Mainly cloudy skies ahead for Friday

Plus a look ahead at your weekend

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of Aug. 23

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Should there be a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers?

We’ve all heard them, and most likely cursed them under our breath.… Continue reading

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Man at centre of dropped HIV-disclosure case sues province and 10 cops

Brian Carlisle of Abbotsford says Mission RCMP defamed him and were ‘negligent’ in their investigation

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

Most Read