Oak Bay police reserve Const. and 2014 Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock rider Jordan Carrie spins for donations at the Oak Bay Night Market.

On the road for kids with cancer

2014 Tour de Rock team includes Oak Bay rider

Jordan Carrie still remembers the excitement of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Tour de Rock team entering the gym at Spectrum Secondary.

“They announced the (2014) team at Reynolds (secondary). I’d heard stories about (the team) going in there and the gym comes alive,” he said. “I remember when they came to Spectrum and you feel the energy and hear the stories, it’s amazing.”

Carrie’s involvement with the police and the Tour de Rock goes back to his childhood.

“I grew up in View Royal and Colwood. My dad volunteered for years with the West Shore RCMP, with Constables on Patrol, different police boards and stuff … I always wanted to be a police officer, as far back as I can remember.”

He spent 10 years as an RCMP auxiliary, until last year when he became a reserve constable with the Oak Bay police department. “Oak Bay is a good community, they really support the reserve program and support the police.”

The 30 year old works for Island Health Protection Services, which he said has also been very supportive of his position with the 2014 Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock team.

“There’s amazing community support for Tour de Rock. Everybody’s been helpful and supportive: my wife Sarah; Island Health; the Oak Bay BIA gave me a spot at the four markets (where) there’s a lot of support from the community (with) people coming by to say hi or talk; the Tea Party made room for us.”

When Carrie realized he could apply for the Tour this year, he deferred an application to the police. “This was to be the year, then the opportunity to join Tour de Rock came up and I knew I had to try out.”

He borrowed a bike and began training on his own before being named to the team in May.

“I had to learn how to clip in … I had a few tumbles,” he said with a laugh.

Over the last few months he’s learned to ride hills with speed. “Mount Washington was really challenging – that was extreme heat. I must have drank nine bottles of water and I had nothing left in me. I sweat it all out.”

Carrie set himself a $10,000 fundraising goal and has already met it. He’s now aiming to raise as much money as he can for Vancouver Island kids with cancer.

“You get one shot at it, you have to put in 110 per cent. Everyone on the team has put a lot of their own personal stuff on hold, but it’s an excellent opportunity.”

He has a junior rider, Matt Williams, 16, who has given him extra inspiration for the 1,000 kilometre ride. “He inspires me. He very definitely inspires me. Everyone we met at Camp Goodtimes was inspiring. That (visit) gives you that extra punch, that extra push forward. Even though your goal might be to raise as much as you can get. When you see those people, those kids and families dealing with cancer, you can’t reach high enough.”

The Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock raises money for pediatric cancer research and programs for children with a history of cancer. The Tour de Rock team cycles from one end of the Vancouver Island to the other, over 14 days, covering 1,000 kilometres. This year’s ride began on Sept. 21 and ends Oct. 3 in Victoria. The 24 riders will be in Oak Bay, including a stop at Oak Bay High, on Oct. 2.

For more on the Tour de Rock, go to tourderock.ca.