Oak Bay Police all a-Twitter

Force uses social media tool to connect with community

Sgt. Ian Craib worked the night shift in Oak Bay during the long weekend. Of course, if you follow the Oak Bay Police Twitter account, you already know that.

Since April of this year, Craib and Police Chief Mark Fisher have been tweeting about the work of the Oak Bay Police Department. Most often, the tweets are designed to create awareness of police and community issues.

“It’s a great way to engage individuals within the community that we might never otherwise have contact with,” said Fisher. “We use it for news releases, information regarding current events, and other issues affecting the department. We also use it to open a dialogue with people regarding our work and their concerns in the community.”

Sometimes the tweets are coming from Craib as he’s on the job. “This past weekend, while Sgt. Craib was on duty, he managed to send out a few tweets regarding what was going on and what he was dealing with. It was a great way to let people know the kind of challenges we’re facing out there and how we’re managing them,” said Fisher. “It also gives us the chance to alert the public about things that they should be looking out for.”

“Obviously we’re doing the job first,” he added. “But if we have the chance to send a few tweets, it helps people understand what we’re facing out there.”

Police use of social media isn’t a new concept. Mike Russell, the Media Relations and Social Media Officer for the Victoria Police Department says that his department has been using social media for the past three years. “We have 6,300 followers on Twitter and over 2,000 ‘likes’ on Facebook,” he said.

“We also post videos on YouTube to create awareness of crime prevention issues in the community,” said Russell. “But maybe the best thing about our use of Twitter is that we get to generate conversations with citizens about their thoughts and suggestions. It’s been very positive.”

While the use of social media is relatively new to the Oak Bay Police, the reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. “We’re still getting our heads around all the applications,” said Fisher. “But it’s something we’re very happy to be doing. In fact, in July, we even used Twitter to make people aware of a job opening we had within the department. It was great. I’m sure we’ll be doing a lot more of that sort of thing in the future.”

Follow the Oak Bay Police on Twitter.

Follow the Oak Bay News on Twitter.

Just Posted

British Columbians pay more for goods and services than most other Canadians

Year-to-year inflation rate up 2.2 per cent in October second-highest rate in Canada

Resident pushes for electric in Saanich’s leaf blower replacement plan

Saanich owns more than 80 leaf blowers, 51 of which will expire by 2025

UVic students return from Hong Kong amidst growing tension

All eight University of Victoria exchange students have returned to Canada

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Nov. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Do you plan on making any purchases on Black Friday?

We’ve all seen the images. Shoppers rioting outside of a store in… Continue reading

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

Nanaimo man caught with more than 200,000 child porn images to be sentenced

Crown says Aaron Macrae recorded video of children on buses and at his workplace

Vancouver Island hunters may have harvested deer in area known for chronic wasting disease

Conservation officers make urgent request to public for any information

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Most Read