Recreation Oak Bay staff practise CPR as part of their first aid training. Now they lead the way in blended learning

Oak Bay a leader in first aid

Online program cuts classroom commitment in half while offering same certification

Recreation Oak Bay is a hotspot of technological safety.

They recently finished a new format utilized by companies nation-wide, a “blended learning” Standard First Aid course through Canadian Red Cross.

“It’s a new format the Red Cross is offering, it was just introduced in the spring of this year,” said Alana Marks, the aquatics programmer for Recreation Oak Bay who introduced the course. “We find a lot of our patrons don’t have the time, or find it difficult to find the two-day timeframe to do the course. It’s limiting for them.”

The new format offers about eight hours of classroom theory online in different modules that include videos and slideshows. Once participants complete that portion, there’s a scheduled one-day practical session with instructors.

“It’s appealing for people with young kids or students,” Marks said.

In the Capital Region, Oak Bay is the first to provide the option with a soft trial of four registrants in September and another (nine currently registered) with a Nov. 29 hands-on date.

“This is a program that is available pretty much across the country. It’s actually been reviewed and approved by workplace regulators in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and a number of provinces out east,” Adamson said. “Oak Bay was one of the first public-offered programs available.”

Those who successfully complete the program get the same education and certification as the traditional two-day classroom setting.

“We have a number of organizations that have picked up the program for within their organizations,” said Dave Adamson, first aid program representative for Canadian Red Cross.

For example, police and fire organizations across B.C. utilize it for for upgrading and ongoing training.

“There are a few others that are looking at it. Oak Bay is the first that has picked it up and is using it.”

Others in Greater Victoria do have it on the radar, he added.

“One of the attractions with recreation centres is the clientele they’re dealing with tend to be young teens or 20s techno-savvy people who are used to doing online learning formats,” Adamson said. “It really fits with their clientele.”

 

cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

 

 

Just Posted

Man pleads not guilty in 1987 slayings of Victoria couple

William Talbott of SeaTac was arraigned Tuesday in Snohomish County Superior Court

Officials worry of fire risk at homeless camp

Regina Park camp has grown to 77 tents

Oak Bay Optometry barbecue raises funds for Senegal ocular health

Fundraising barbecue June 28 from 5 to 9 p.m. at 2075 Cadboro Bay Rd.

Crews search for missing kayaker near Sooke

The person was seen launching their kayak from Beecher Bay on Monday at noon

Pass a pint: Great Canadian Beer Festival tickets on sale now

Over 200 brews and ciders will be featured at this year’s craft celebration

Willows school boasts newest Oak Bay playground

Grand opening Monday at École Willows elementary

Senate officially passes Canada’s marijuana legalization bill

Bill C-45 now moves to royal assent, which is the final step in the legislative process

POLL: Do you have a family doctor?

“I don’t have a family doctor,” is an all too familiar phrase… Continue reading

Fake attempted abduction not funny to B.C. neighbourhood residents

Two teenage boys won’t face criminal charges after scaring girl

Mosquitoes out in full force already? Blame the weather

But a B.C. mosquito expert says the heat wave will help keep the pests at bay

New GOP plan: Hold kids longer at border – but with parents

Move would ease rules that limit how much time minors can be held with their parents

Without a big data strategy, Canadians at risk of being ‘data cows’

Presentation said artificial intelligence could give Facebook and Amazon even more power

Five B.C. families stuck in Japan as Canada refuses visas for adopted babies

Lawyer points to change in American policy around adoptions from Japan

It may be ‘lights, camera, action!’ for talented B.C. doctor

Rob Forde is waiting to hear if he’ll become The Basement Doctor in his own reality show

Most Read