The grave of Sir James Douglas at Ross Bay Cemetery was vandalized overnight. (Facebook/Old Cemeteries Society)

Grave site at Ross Bay Cemetery vandalized overnight

Graffiti found on grave of Sir James Douglas

A grave site in Victoria’s Ross Bay Cemetery was vandalized overnight with graffiti painted onto a tombstone and a nearby tree.

The grave of Sir James Douglas was the target of the crime, which the Victoria Police Department said happened some time between 3:30 p.m. Wednesday and 7 a.m. Thursday.

“No officer was dispatched as there was no witness, suspect information or CCTV footage to obtain,” said Const. Cameron MacIntyre of VicPD.

READ ALSO: First Nations act to reclaim name of Mount Doug

MacIntyre said it is unknown if the mischief was targeted.

A Facebook post made by Old Cemeteries Society shared photos of the vandalism Thursday morning. By Thursday afternoon, another post was made showing that the grave site had been cleaned and thanking the City of Victoria Parks department for the cleanup.

“The Sir James Douglas monument has been cleaned and tagging removed,” the post says. “Really nice to see the city react so quickly.”

READ ALSO: The Douglas Treaties: A legacy of controversy

According to the Canadian Encyclopedia, Sir James Douglas was governor of Vancouver Island and B.C. and was a fur trader who died in August, 1877. From 1850 to 1854 he negotiated 14 land purchases with First Nations on the Island, including land in and around Fort Victoria, Fort Rupert and Nanaimo. The purchases are known as the controversial Douglas Treaties.

At the time the treaties were signed, Douglas was then chief factor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

shalu.mehta@blackpress.ca


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Victoria Fire Department investigating explosion at supportive housing complex

The explosion blew out a window and caused damage to the frame of the building

Victoria to consider new appeals process for rejected short-term rental applications

There is not an established process in place for people seeking to reapply

Vehicle bursts into flames due to mechanical failure, occupants escape injury

View Royal firefighters were on scene less than five minutes after the first 911 call

West Shore RCMP snag suspect in early morning mail theft

Citizen call leads officers to quickly locate suspect

Canadian seniors isolated with fewer friends, less access to internet

Findings appear in assessment of health and social challenges associated with COVID-19

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Look at hospitalizations, not recovery stats for COVID-19, B.C. professor says

Cases in hospital are a definitive count of people who have the novel coronavirus

B.C. First Nations want to launch fight of Trans Mountain pipeline approval

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges about the pipeline

N95 masks on the way for Canada after 3M reaches deal with White House

The Trump White House had ordered 3M to stop shipping masks to Canada

COLUMN: The other graph that shows B.C. can beat COVID-19

Is the curve being flattened? data on hospitalizations provides a crucial answer.

Most Read