Feds to introduce co-developed legislation on Indigenous child services in 2019

Indigenous children are more than 50 per cent of the children in foster care in private homes in Canada

The Liberal government says it will introduce federal legislation on Indigenous child and family services in the new year, written in co-operation with Indigenous groups.

Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott says Canada has taken Indigenous kids from their families for more than a century through residential schools and child-welfare agencies.

Philpott says this proposed legislation will end that. She says taking kids away because their families live in poverty or because they have unresolved health issues will not be allowed.

READ MORE: 53 B.C. daycares move to $10-a-day pilot

READ MORE: Early learning programs for Indigenous kids get $30M boost

Philpott made the announcement in the House of Commons foyer today alongside Assembly of First Nationals National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed, and Métis National Council President Clément Chartier.

Indigenous children are more than 50 per cent of the children in foster care in private homes in Canada, according to government figures, and they face greater risks of having health problems and being incarcerated.

Bellegarde says legislation co-developed with First Nations is an important step toward fixing the system, and Obed called it an “unprecedented initiative” that will ensure the survival, dignity and well-being of families, communities and nation for generations to come.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

2020 Budget: ICBC shortfall continues ahead of new rate-reduction plan

ICBC operating with $91-million deficit for 2019-2020 fiscal year

Forest industry supporters and convoy arrive at B.C. legislature

Rally delivers petition in favour of ‘working forests’

Victoria police ask victims of human trafficking to come forward in light of recent arrests

Four people from Vancouver Island were arrested in Saskatchewan on Jan. 28

Updated: Sightseeing airplane crashes in Saanich farm

Two sent to hospital with minor injuries after Cessna 172 crash at 8:55 a.m.

Victoria budtenders become first private cannabis workers to unionize in Canada

Two of seven Clarity Cannabis storefronts vote to join UFCW 1518 union

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

Budget 2020: B.C. adds tax to sweet drinks and sodas

All soda, vending machine drinks will be subject to higher PST

Budget 2020: B.C. unveils new grant for students, phases out debt-relief program

For the first time, diploma, certificate students qualify for yearly post-secondary grant

Budget 2020: B.C. NDP taps top tax bracket for more revenue

Minimum wage set to pass $15 an hour by 2021

Budget 2020: Not much new for B.C.’s struggling forest industry

Focus on wood waste utilization, efficiency, Carole James says

Skull reconstruction gives new insight into unknown man found in B.C. cemetery

RCMP released a 3-D skull reconstruction of a man who was found dead on July 2, 1998

Ten poisoned eagles rushed to veterinary hospital in Nanaimo

Eagles stricken after eating flesh of euthanized animal at Nanaimo Regional Landfill

Trudeau says Wet’suwet’en crisis, rail blockades a critical moment for country

First Nations leaders suggest it may be time to peacefully end the blockades

Kids exposed to household cleaners as newborns more likely to get asthma: B.C. study

Air fresheners, plug-in deodorizers, antimicrobial hand sanitizers and oven cleaners were the worst culprits

Most Read