Chief carver Clarence Dick works on the welcome pole the Community Association of Oak Bay will raise at Oak Bay High School this fall.

Crowdfunding campaign to support pole carving

Association uses BlackPress4Good to push the campaign for a welcome pole at Oak Bay High

Public art, acknowledgement of historical land use and education are elements that drive Tasha Noble to push the Sno’uyutth Pole Project.

A director of the Community Association of Oak Bay, she launched the association’s crowdfunding campaign with BlackPress4Good to push the campaign for a welcome pole at Oak Bay High to fruition.

“So far we’ve raised over $50,000 in the community and now we need to get to the next level to get to the next stage of carving,” said Noble.

They hope to achieve the next $7,000, of an $88,000 budget, within 50 days.

“We’d love help from businesses,” she said. “Anything over $200 you are recognized on our website … Anything over $50 you get a tax receipt.”

See the campaign at fundrazr.com/campaigns/4ya0e online.

“People can watch our journey so far, see where we’ve come,” Noble said of the informative website.

Master Songhees carver Butch Dick designed Sno’uyutth, which means spreading good energy.

His son Clarence Dick is lead carver on the project commissioned by the Community Association of Oak Bay. Currently underway in a carving hut at Songhees Wellness Centre, the association aims to raise the pole at the new Oak Bay High School this fall.

“I think public art is something we need to recognize in our community it brings families and people together. Also the history of our land, we’re on Coast Salish land, so we should remember the history of our area,” said Noble.

“A big part, for me, is we’re going to have educational seminars in the fall, what welcome poles mean and signify.”

They plan to host an event or two throughout the year at the carving shed for children to learn about the carving and understand the culture.

 

Anyone seeking more information can contact Noble at oakbayconnector@gmail.com.