B.C. government earmarks more cash to help new immigrants settle

Services to be expanded by 45 per cent, Surrey presser reveals

Services to help new immigrants settle throughout B.C. will be expanded by 45 per cent, the provincial government has announced.

Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology Bruce Ralston, NDP MLA for Surrey-Whalley, revealed the news at DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society in Surrey Friday.

“This is a major step forward in delivering more and better opportunities for newcomers while helping our province benefit from the skills they bring with them,” Ralston said.

“Too often people immigrating to our province haven’t been able to leverage their knowledge and experience into productive employment. The steps we’re taking will remove barriers to opportunities by expanding credential recognition supports, language training and other services, helping make their lives better and more fulfilling.”

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A program called Career Paths for Skilled Immigrants will get $5.7 million to help new immigrants to B.C. get their credentials assessed and find jobs within their chosen profession, through more workshops and career counselling sessions.

BC Settlement and Integration Services will get more funds to provide more than 16,000 people in 60 communities throughout the province with language training and other supports.

Neelam Sahota, CEO of DIVERSEcity, noted that transitioning to a new country “does not come without challenges” and the funding will “help empower newcomers to become active participants in their community.”



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

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