Norm Tesluk

Norm Tesluk

Adopted dogs: never a good gift idea

“It’s not anything that should ever be given on an impulse. If your mother-in-law wants a dog then she should be the one to apply.”

  • Dec. 14, 2011 10:00 a.m.

Shortly after the story of Lisa Atterby’s efforts to rescue cocker spaniels was featured in the News, she had to turn down a prospective buyer. It wasn’t that Atterby didn’t have animals in need of homes. The problem for Atterby was that the dog was being bought to give away as a Christmas present.

“Dogs are a commitment for 12 to 15 years,” Atterby said. “It’s not anything that should ever be given on an impulse. If your mother-in-law wants a dog then she should be the one to apply.”

At Petcetera in Tillicum Centre, where an animal rescue adoption service has been available since July, the rate of adoptions have doubled in the last two weeks as Christmas nears.

“There aren’t really too many requirements that we set,” said manager at large Rachel Davis. “But if we don’t feel comfortable adopting out, we will say no.”

For a flat $400 fee, Petcetera re-homes abandoned, confiscated or stray dogs from Las Vegas, which come to Saanich via a company called Foreclosed Upon Pets Inc.

But it’s not always so straightforward for some animal lovers hoping to make a difference in a dog’s life. Which is why it’s important to look into who you’re buying from when considering the trendy notion of rescuing a pet.

“There are definitely people out there who are just interested in making some finances off of animals, let’s be honest,” said Saanich pound officer Derek Rees, noting that are complications caused because there is no limit on the number of dogs that can legally be imported into Canada.

In the summer, Rees encountered a woman who had imported 15 dogs from Mexico to be sold in Saanich.

“(She) believed she was doing the right thing at the time,” he said. “I bumped into her when she had a total of 20 dogs in her van.”

Penny Stone, branch manager of the B.C. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, agrees that some independent dog importers are not capable of caring for the animals they import, despite their intentions.

“There are some really good reputable breed rescues out there, but there are also the people who aren’t quite prepared,” she said.

While not a huge issue, Stone said, several times per year, the branch receives rescued dogs that have been surrendered by their ill-prepared importers. She suggests prospective owners do some research, including contact the SPCA, to learn more about an individual or organization rescuing animals.

nnorth@saanichnews.com

Healthy dogs, up for adoption at Saanich veterinary service

Pound officer Derek Reese regularly receives complaints from dog owners in Saanich. Many are concerned that required medical certification to bring dogs into Canada is given too freely and that sick dogs may infect local animals with communicable diseases.

“They really don’t present any health risk to local dogs,” said veterinarian Malcolm Macartney, owner of McKenzie Veterinary Services.

Macartney, who works alongside Mexican vets in spay and neuter clinics, does not see any issue with the certification process.

“Most people vaccinate their pets and vaccines do work.”

Macartney has four small street dogs he rescued from Mexico on Nov. 21 available for adoption through McKenzie Veterinary Services. The fee to adopt the dogs is $250 and more information, including photos of the animals, is available at www.mckvets.com.

Just Posted

Deep Cove Elementary School principal Shelley Hardcastle (right) and vice-principal Mary Kaercher help to restock Reay Creek with fish – in this case, coho fry – after a recent bleach spill killed hundreds of fish. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
North Saanich’s Deep Cove Elementary School helps to restock Sidney’s Reay Creek

Restocking followed bleach spill that killed hundreds of fish in creek

The barred owl is the most likely to be spotted in the south Island. (Ann Nightingale photo)
Barred owls dominate Greater Victoria owl-scape

Western screech owl population decimated, partly due to barred owls

Between June 1 and 7, 168 net unconditional sales were made for properties in the VREB region. (Black Press Media file photo)
Victoria home sales slightly behind last June’s pace

Benchmark value of single-family home in Greater Victoria tops $1 million

A new report pegs the annual cost of hiring a third party to monitor use of pickleball courts in North Saanich at $12,000. (Black Press Media file photo).
North Saanich could end up hiring third party to monitor pickleball courts

Other options up for consideration include use of cameras and timed locks

Police monitor protesters at a blockade in the Fairy Creek area of southwestern Vancouver Island on Wednesday, June 9. (Facebook photo)
8 old-growth logging protesters arrested in Fairy Creek watershed Friday

A total of 214 people have been arrested as of June 11

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Most Read