Making a difference for seniors in the community

Personalized care helps seniors rediscover life’s joy

Sudden-onset short-term memory loss In his late 90s left one senior unable to care for himself, and without family nearby to help, staying in the home he loved, surrounded by familiarity, seemed unlikely. Then his relatives found the caregiving team at Senior Care Victoria and hope was restored. Discovering his longtime passion for music, one caregiver provides music therapy, playing the piano and singing songs together. Learning of his love for dogs, another caregiver surprised him with a special visit to see her friend’s puppies. These events have triggered long-term memory, and while he may not remember who cares for him each day, he remembers music and especially the puppies!

A different approach to care

The above experience reflects just a sampling of Senior Care Victoria’s services, all based on a philosophy of providing above-and-beyond service, whether visiting an hour each week to provide companionship or cook a warm meal, or providing 24-hour care as clients near the end of life.

“It’s not just care, it’s creating a sense of family and creating trusting relationships,” notes owner Johanna Booy. “We help seniors stay in their homes, or provide companionship if in a facility where one-on-one contact is desperately needed. We’re not a franchise, so I wanted to do something unique that made a difference in seniors lives.”

That means taking the time to get to know each client so the right care team can be created.

“Our primary focus is finding the best fit and providing consistent, quality care. Seeing the same person each time builds friendship and trust.”

Another full-of-life gentleman in his early 80s had lost his sight but loved to eat, and the Senior Care Victoria home support team fueled his appetite and delight by cooking sumptuous meals that made his day. When a sudden illness confined him to his bed, the palliative team stepped in and stayed with him in rotation, including his regular caregivers he had grown to know and love. On the day he passed, his caregivers visited and he whispered “thank you,” surrounded by comfort and love. it was peaceful and beautiful.

Connecting families through support

Providing services ranging from companionship to end-of-life care, that sense of family and trust is vital, especially with many clients having no local family to call upon and family members feeling helpless.

“Our clients’ families are as far away as New Zealand, but we work closely with them and the client creating respite and peace of mind for both,” Booy says. “We’re available 24 hours a day to our clients and their families.

“We also offer consulting for families trying to navigate the complex Greater Victoria care system to point them in the right direction. This service can be a lifesaver as the task of finding care is a daunting one.”

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