The proposed development on Third Street that would be home to a revamped Star Cinema.

Significant developments Sidney to get more public scrutiny

Council approves recommendations from community group

Developers with what the Town of Sidney deems ‘significant’ building proposals will be encouraged to hold public information meetings before bringing their plans to town hall.

Councillors this week voted to formalize what only a few developers have been doing — holding community meetings to gauge people’s reactions to large projects before starting an official application process with the municipality. Most recently, proponents of the Cameo development at the corner of Third Street and Sidney Avenue (involving Star Cinema) held public open houses about their plans. As well, the company looking at redeveloping the Cedarwood Inn on Lochside Drive in Sidney, held a pubic meeting on their plans for multiple six-storey buildings.

The changes to the Town’s policy comes after the Sidney Community Association gave the municipality a list of ideas in the wake of increased resident angst over growth issues.

RELATED: Public invited to weigh in on Star Cinema proposal.

RELATED: Six stories a non-starter at Sidney’s Cedarwood Inn site.

Now, under new rules that will be written into Sidney’s development permit guide, companies looking to make significant changes to a property would be asked to take their plan to the public. It’s only a recommendation, noted staff in a report to council, citing the difficulty the Town would have enforcing it.

Other changes to the municipal bylaw on land use procedures include: increasing the mail-out notification radius from 75 metres to 100 for proposed zoning and official community plan amendments; adding a notice of new (major) development application step in the downtown commercial core; increasing fees associated with public hearings – including advertising; and posting more information on the town’s website.

All notices of new development applications will be posted to the Town’s website, expanding their existing notices web page.

As for the designation “significant development proposals,” that would apply to new buildings or major renovations (regardless of the number of storeys) in the Town’s main commercial zones, bounded by Sidney Avenue and James White Boulevard in the north, Oakville Avenue to the south, the waterfront in the east and the portion of Victoria Airport Authority land in the west that is being eyed for the proposed Sidney Crossing commercial development. The latter project, staff note, is under the jurisdiction of the Airport Authority, not the Town.

This designation does not apply to areas of Town zoned for multi-family residential homes.

The recommendations passed unanimously, but Councillor Tim Chad warned council that such changes will add workload to municipal staff, and that could mean Sidney needs more staff to keep up — and that would means more tax dollars to pay for them.



editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Significant projects policy changes are including within the red and purple zoning areas of downtown Sidney. (Town of Sidney)

Just Posted

Heritage Fair at Ecole Willows

Research involved accessing primary research sources from Oak Bay Archives

Oak Bay celebrates Willows’ trusted and loved crossing guard

Margaret Hill showered with love on her 70th birthday

Cops corral pig on the loose in Cordova Bay

Pig was trotting towards Pat Bay Highway from Cordova Ridge

Celebrate Earth Day with Surfrider

Beach cleanup and social gathering Sunday at Clover Point

BCSPCA’s proposed limits on chickens go too far: urban food advocate

Capping the number of hens at 12 an unnecessary solution, Aaren Topley tells Victoria council

Party send-off for The Nose Knows

Controversial art on its way to public exhibition in Palm Springs, California

Spring Home Show this weekend in Colwood

West Shore Parks and Recreation will be transformed to showcase everything home related

Unions set for national strike against CP Rail

Locomotive engineers, conductors and signals specialists seeking new collective agreements.

B.C. woman known to hitchhike around province missing

Aislynn Hanson, 18, last seen April 13; known to travel throughout B.C. by hitchhiking

B.C. court relies on Facebook to track down missing defendant

A court in Princeton, B.C. relied on Facebook to track down a B.C. missing his court date

Accused in B.C. school stabbing found unfit to stand trial

Decision will put hold on upcoming trial for Gabriel Klein

Producer, DJ Avicii found dead at 28

Swedish-born artist Tim Bergling, was found in Muscat, Oman

Updated: Cars lined up around the block as gas hits 109.9 in B.C. city

The gas wars continue in Vernon, B.C. with prices as low as $109.9 in North Okanagan

Trudeau ends 3-country tour with global reputation, alliances intact

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau finds footing on the world stage after China and India controversies

Most Read