Long-time Goldstream Food Bank volunteers Cec Cancade and Gloria Driscoll fill another cart of groceries ready for a family in need. (Rick Stiebel/News staff)

Giving back for the long haul at the Goldstream Food Bank

Food bank volunteers make a difference for many

Rick Stiebel

News staff

Volunteers are the strength that keeps the Goldstream Food Bank running, said president Gayle Ireland.

“Without them, we wouldn’t exist,” she underlined. “We simply wouldn’t be able to fulfill our mission without their dedication and hard work. Each and every one of them is so valuable.”

READ MORE: Food bank program sees increased need

It becomes obvious quickly if a volunteer has what it takes to keep up with the fast pace that’s a staple of the food bank, especially on the days it’s open to the public. “They either get hooked right away or we never see them again,” she noted.

The first assessment rings true with Gloria Driscoll and Cec Cancade, who have more than 36 years of volunteer service between them.

Driscoll began volunteering at the Goldstream Food Bank when it moved into the basement of the Royal Canadian Legion in Langford in 1999 because she wanted to keep active during her retirement. “I think it’s a good thing to do,” explained the View Royal resident. “There’s a definite need. We help 70 to 80 people each day two days a week. It gets closer to 200 on a busy week, and we seem to be getting a lot of new people.”

The demand keeps all of the volunteers busy, she noted. “There’s a couple of girls on each aisle, and there’s always work to be done. Right now we have one volunteer who hurt himself and anther’s in hospital, so it keeps you hopping.”

“We have a great crew, we think we’re the best,” Driscoll joked. “Everyone’s very self-sufficient at finding something to do. It’s very rewarding when you see how happy people are to receive groceries. One girl, her first time, burst into tears.”

Langford resident Cec Candcade, a volunteer for 16 years, said he enjoys his volunteer work as well. “I’m retired, so it gives me something to do in the morning and there’s a lot of really nice people down here.”

The biggest change he’s noticed during the past few years is that the people coming into the food bank are younger and older. “That tells me there’s a lot of people struggling out there,” he said. “I’ve talked to seniors on pensions and young people working two minimum wage jobs just to survive.”

Cancade is glad to help out, and appreciates that there are lots of people on the West Shore and lots of businesses as well making donations to keep the food bank running.

“We’d be really hard pressed without them,” he noted.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

rick.stiebel@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Oak Bay’s Food Forum closes after 37 years

Open on Christmas Day, the Estevan Village grocery had lovable quirks

UPDATED: Oak Bay father takes stand, denies killing young daughters

Andrew Berry has plead not guilty to the December 2017 deaths of his two daughters

Relative of man found dead in Saanich says he was missing for years

RCMP and a private detective had been searching for him since 2012

Saanich Police warn of counterfeit money being used

Several fake $100 bills have been reported in Greater Victoria

Victoria police seek help finding ‘high risk’ missing woman

Brown, 30, is described as an Indigenous woman standing five feet, six inches tall, weighing 170 pounds

VIDEO: Title of 25th Bond movie is ‘No Time to Die’

The film is set to be released in April 2020

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of Aug. 23

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Should there be a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers?

We’ve all heard them, and most likely cursed them under our breath.… Continue reading

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

B.C. seniors allowed more choice to stay in assisted living

Province doesn’t need to wait for a complaint to investigate care, Adrian Dix says

Retired B.C. fisherman wins record $60M Lotto Max jackpot

Joseph Katalinic won the biggest Lotto Max prize ever awarded

Island manslaughter suspect found not guilty in Supreme Court

Court accepts accused’s argument of self-defence for 2017 incident in Courtenay

Most Read