Queen’s Printer outsourcing press work

Revenues have fallen as more electronic documents are used in government, printing operations contracted out by next summer

Government employees picket the Queen's Printer office during the 2012 teacher strike.

VICTORIA – The shift to digital documents has prompted the B.C. government to contract out printing services, long performed by the Queen’s Printer.

Press and copier operations in the Queen’s Printer building next to the B.C. legislature are to be phased out by the summer of 2015, contracted out to private printers. The move affects 31 unionized staff, in an effort to reduce costs as part of the government’s core review of services.

“Demand for printing has declined with the growth of electronic publishing and digital information, and this is true for government as well,” said Andrew Wilkinson, minister of technology, innovation and citizens’ services.

Wilkinson said a transition plan for employees is being worked on with their union, Unifor, and the Public Service Agency.

The Queen’s Printer provides legislation and other sessional documents for the legislature, as well as proclamations, plaques and other items. Its revenues have declined by $7.5 million or 43 per cent in the past five years.

The Queen’s Printer building, a four-storey 1928 Art Deco heritage structure, has recently been renovated and is not planned to be sold. The print shop facilities are on the ground floor, which will be converted to other uses.

“The Queen’s Printer will use its knowledge of the printing industry to continue to broker printing contracts on behalf of government and will continue to support the B.C. legislature and deliver services such as BC Laws and protocol and recognition products,” Wilkinson said.

 

Just Posted

Parents call for change to health laws after Oak Bay teen’s death

Accidental overdose has Elliot Eurchuk’s parents seeking change to B.C Infants Act

Tsawout hosts Saanich Peninsula community leaders at blanket ceremony

Reconciliation event meant to share the Indigenous exerience

WATCH:First responders score first, take inaugural Challenge Cup in Oak Bay

Ice hockey game raises funds for Cops for Cancer, encourages positive interaction with youth

Amazing Race Canada kicks off at Hatley Castle

Popular reality TV show will premiere later this year

LGBTQ advocates turn Victoria SOGI protest into dance party

Counter-protest outnumbers anti-SOGI activists on lawn of B.C. legislature

WATCH:First responders score first, take inaugural Challenge Cup in Oak Bay

Ice hockey game raises funds for Cops for Cancer, encourages positive interaction with youth

As Osoyoos Indian Band flourishes, so too does Okanagan’s wine tourism

Indigenous practices have driven growth of South Okanagan’s wine history and agricultural influence

Judith Guichon steps down as Lieutenant Governor of B.C.

Election decision didn’t make her best moments from the past six years

Vancouver to rake in $30 million in empty homes tax in first year

The tax is the first of its kind in Canada, and was intended to address the city’s near-zero vacancy rate

B.C.’s snowpack continues to increase, melting delayed

River Forecast Centre official says sudden melting further into the season could cause flooding

Another B.C. First Nation voices support for Kinder Morgan pipeline

Simpcw First Nation claims people living on one-third of pipeline route support the project

Scooter crash leaves Island man with critical injuries

RCMP said a truck was making a left-hand turn when it collided with the scooter travelling through the intersection

Prankster broadcasts fake nuclear threat in Winnipeg

The audio recording on Sunday warned of a nuclear attack against Canada and the United States

ICBC reform aims to slow rising car insurance costs

‘Pain and suffering’ payouts to be capped, major injury limit to double

Most Read