B.C.’s carbon tax is now twice the level charged in Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and New Brunswick, where the federal government is imposing it. (Black Press Media)

B.C. carbon tax up April 1, other provinces begin to catch up

Greenhouse gas charge approaching 10 cents a litre on gasoline

B.C.’s carbon tax goes up to $40 a tonne effective Monday, as other provinces are required by Ottawa to start paying the climate change charge on carbon fuels at half that rate.

The latest B.C. carbon tax increase brings the cost to 9.98 cents per litre of gasoline, once the federal GST is applied on top of it, according to the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

“If you have a two-vehicle household with a Toyota Camry and Dodge Ram and you fill up once a week, this hike to the B.C. carbon tax is going to cost your family an extra $146 per year for commuting to work, dropping the kids off at school and driving to the grocery store,” said Kris Sims, B.C. director of the federation.

The minority B.C. NDP government has made two changes since coming into office in 2017. To gain the support of the B.C. Green Party, they started increasing the carbon tax last year, with annual increases to 2021 to reach the $50-per-tonne level mandated by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

READ MORE: Saskatchewan in court to battle carbon tax

READ MORE: B.C. carbon tax costs more than natural gas

The four provinces that have refused to implement their own carbon tax, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and New Brunswick, have it imposed as of April 1 at $20 per tonne. Carbon tax is emerging as a key issue in the federal election set for next fall, with dissident provinces launching court challenges to what they say is an intrusion into their jurisdiction by Ottawa.

The other change made by the B.C. NDP is ending the “revenue neutral” requirement, which triggered automatic decreases in business and personal income tax to offset the revenue. While B.C. Finance Minister Carole James didn’t increase income tax rates for this year, the rising carbon tax now comes off the bottom line of higher-income family budgets. James added an additional $40 million to B.C.’s fund for lower-income families to offset carbon tax.

Another major tax change for B.C. is the advent of the Employer Health Tax (EHT) on payrolls exceeding $500,000 per year. Employers shoulder that as well as the remaining year of Medical Services Plan premiums for those that pay MSP as part of a pay package.

Many B.C. municipalities, bound by union contracts that include covering employee MSP, are raising property taxes to cover the additional costs of the EHT.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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