Pulling weeds helps habitat

Vounteers wanted to help pull ivy and Scotch broom

  • Fri Mar 8th, 2013 1:00pm
  • News

Plant lovers, gardeners or even those who just like to be outside helping the community are invited to join the Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association and Oak Bay Parks to help control the invasive plants at Harling Point Chinese Cemetery National Historic Site.

In addition to being an important part of local and national history, Harling Point is also a unique ecosystem, which is home to some rare and endangered plants.

“Macown’s Meadowfoam is federally listed as threatened,” said Chris Junck, species at risk outreach specialist. “Harling Point is also home to Bear’s Foot Sanicle which is also listed as endangered, and it is one of only a few locations where Victoria Owl-Clover is found.”

On Saturday, March 16, volunteers are asked to join the effort to pull Scotch Broom and English Ivy in an effort to preserve one of the few Garry Oak ecosystems left in the region.

“In the CRD they are down to one per cent of all the Garry Oak habitats that were here about 160 to 200 years ago,” Junck said.

Development threatens habitat, as well as invasive plants like Scotch broom, daffodils, non-native grasses and English ivy.

“The rare plants are at the edge of their northern range so there are environmental factors effecting them as well,” Junck said.

Volunteers are asked to meet at 1 p.m. at the Chinese Cemetery, which can be found by turning left at Crescent Road on to Penzance Road and going to the end of the block.

Organizers will provide, tools, snacks and a tour to see some of the rare plant species, but volunteers are being asked to dress for the weather and thorns, wear sturdy footwear and gloves.

For more information contact Junck at chris.junck@goert.ca or 250-383-3445.